0
RESEARCH PAPERS

The Transfer of Heat by Self-Induced Flow in a Rotating Tube

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Gilham

W. S. Atkins Consultants Ltd., Woodcote Grove, Ashley Road, Epsom, Surrey KT18 5BW, United Kingdom

P. C. Ivey

School of Mechanical Engineering, Cranfield Institute of Technology, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 OAL, United Kingdom

J. M. Owen

School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom

J. Turbomach 116(2), 316-326 (Apr 01, 1994) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2928367 History: Received February 24, 1992; Online June 09, 2008

Abstract

This paper provides a review of recently published research on self-induced flow and heat transfer in a rotating tube, together with additional theoretical work on heat transfer to the cylindrical wall of the tube. Earlier work has shown that self-induced flow can occur when a tube, with one end open and the other sealed, is rotated about its axis: Fluid flows along the axis toward the sealed end and returns in an annular layer on the cylindrical wall. The flow and heat transfer on the end wall are similar to those associated with the so-called free disk, and measured velocity distributions in the tube and Nusselt numbers for the end wall are in good agreement with those computed from numerical solutions of the Navier–Stokes and energy equations. The Reynolds analogy is used in this paper to provide a correlation for the computed Nusselt numbers for the cylindical wall, and design correlations are provided to enable the results to be applied to anti-icing systems for the nose bullets of aero-engines.

Copyright © 1994 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In