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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Wake-Induced Transition on a Compressor-Like Flat Plate

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Keith Walters, James H. Leylek

Advanced Computational Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 USA

J. Turbomach 127(1), 52-63 (Feb 09, 2005) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1791650 History: Received December 01, 2002; Revised March 01, 2003; Online February 09, 2005
Copyright © 2005 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Stanton number distribution for flat plate boundary layer test case, showing good agreement between model predictions and experiments
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Two-dimensional model geometry for compressor-like flat plate
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Illustration of 2D mesh used in the current study, including the upstream and near leading edge regions
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Contours of turbulence intensity for low- and high-turbulence steady test cases with the model
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Contours of turbulence intensity using the RKE turbulence model 28, showing fully turbulent boundary layer from leading edge onward, for both cases
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Wall shear stress distribution using three different turbulence models for low-turbulence steady test case (Tuin=1.2%)
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Wall shear stress distribution using three different turbulence models for high-turbulence test case (Tuin=6.4%)
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Static pressure distribution comparison between the model and experiments, indicating separation at low turbulence level, and attached flow for the high-turbulence case
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Time trace of minimum shear stress on top- and bottom-plate surfaces for fred=0.75. The boundary layer is separated for approximately half of each wake passing period.
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Time trace of minimum shear stress for case fred=1.5. The boundary layer remains attached at all times.
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Contours of instantaneous turbulence intensity and corresponding wall shear stress distributions for ten equally spaced times during a single wake passing period. Thick lines indicate instantaneous values, thin lines show low- and high-turbulence steady results.
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Time-averaged wall shear stress distribution for steady and unsteady test cases
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Time-averaged pressure distribution for unsteady cases, showing suppression of separation region relative to low-Tu steady result in Fig. 8
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Time-averaged streamwise velocity profiles for each of the four test cases, at X=0.975. The figure highlights the influence of steady and unsteady transition on boundary layer characteristics.

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