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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Propagation and Decay of Shock Waves in Turbofan Engine Inlets

[+] Author and Article Information
Dilip Prasad, Jinzhang Feng

Aerodynamics Division, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines, East Hartford, CT 06108

J. Turbomach 127(1), 118-127 (Feb 09, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1811102 History: Received October 01, 2003; Revised March 01, 2004; Online February 09, 2005
Copyright © 2005 by ASME
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References

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Prasad, A., and Prasad, D., 2004 “Unsteady Aerodynamics of a Fan Stage With Application to Acoustics,” ASME J. Turbomach., 127 , pp. 64–75.
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Figures

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(a) Shock structure of a supersonic blade section, illustrated using contours of static pressure normalized by freestream total pressure; (b) Normalized static pressure variation along the broken line in (a)
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Variation of F in Eq. (1) with Mx at different values of Mt
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Meridional section of a typical wing-mounted engine nacelle, illustrating the “drooped” entrance plane and cambered axis
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(a) Meridional view of computational model; the outer boundary extends to about 30 engine radii from the spinner nose; (b) grid detail near the leading edge, with every other plane shown for clarity
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Circumferentially averaged Mach number contours for (a) slender nacelle and (b) thick nacelle with reduced throat area
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Normalized pressure field on a meridional midpassage plane for (a) large throat area inlet and (b) inlet with reduced throat area
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(a) Comparison of baseline (— ⋅ — ⋅) and reduced throat area (—) nacelle profiles, (b) distributions of nacelle surface isentropic Mach number Mis and quasi-one-dimensional Mach number M1d, (c) acoustic power evolution along the inlet axis. The symbols denote quasi-one-dimensional quantities for the baseline nacelle (□ ) and thick nacelle (○ ).
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Circumferentially-averaged normalized radial profiles of (a) fan upstream static pressure and (b) fan downstream total pressure for the slender (– ) and thick ([[dashed_line]] ) nacelle configurations
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(a) Isentropic Mach number distributions for the slender nacelle with (– ) and without (— ⋅ — ⋅) extension of length l=0.21. The latter distribution shifted by x=−l is also shown ([[dashed_line]] ). (b) Spatial evolution of the acoustic power.
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(a) Isentropic Mach number distributions for the thick nacelle with (– ) and without (— ⋅ — ⋅) extension of length l=0.21. The latter distribution shifted by x=−l is also shown ([[dashed_line]] ). (b) Spatial evolution of the acoustic power.
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Meridional streamlines for flow past the slender nacelle at (a) 0.25 flight Mach number and (b) simulated static condition
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Circumferentially averaged Mach number contours for (a) slender nacelle and (b) thick nacelle with reduced throat area at the simulated static condtion
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(a) Isentropic Mach number and (b) acoustic power for the slender nacelle at the simulated static (–) and 0.25 flight Mach number (— ⋅ — ⋅) conditions.
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(a) Isentropic Mach number and (b) acoustic power for the thick nacelle at the simulated static (–) and 0.25 flight Mach number (— ⋅ — ⋅) conditions

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