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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Development and Experimental Validation of a Compressor Dynamic Model

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Venturini

 ENDIF - University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, 44100 Ferrara, Italy

J. Turbomach 127(3), 599-608 (Mar 01, 2004) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1928935 History: Received October 01, 2003; Revised March 01, 2004

In recent years, transient response analysis of energy systems is becoming more and more important in optimizing plant operation and control. Furthermore, dynamic analyses are also used to integrate steady-state diagnostic analyses, since they allow the detection of malfunctions characterized by time-dependent effects. The paper deals with the development of a nonlinear modular model for compressor dynamic simulation. After developing the compressor mathematical model through a physics-based approach (laws of conservation and thermal balances), the model is implemented through the MATLAB ® SIMULINK ® tool. Then, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to evaluate the influence of model parameters on the model response. Finally, the model is calibrated on a multistage axial-centrifugal small size compressor running in the test facility of the University of Ferrara (Italy) and validated through experimental data taken on the compressor under investigation.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Module geometrical model

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Figure 2

Compressor test rig and measured variables

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Figure 3

Compressor performance maps: (◯) measured value; (---) second degree polynomial interpolating curve

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Figure 4

Model implementation through the SIMULINK ® tool

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Figure 5

Intake duct friction factor influence

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Figure 6

Exhaust duct friction factor influence

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Figure 7

Exhaust duct hydraulic mean diameter influence

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Figure 8

Rotational speed profile versus time for the two test cases (a) TC1; (b) TC2

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Figure 9

Comparison of predictions and measured values for the TC1 curve: inlet (a) and outlet (b) compressor pressure, mass flow rate (c), and outlet compressor temperature (d)

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Figure 10

Comparison of predictions and measured values for the TC2 curve: inlet (a) and outlet (b) compressor pressure, mass flow rate (c), and outlet compressor temperature (d)

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