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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Rotating Curved Duct at High Rotation and Density Ratios

[+] Author and Article Information
A. K. Sleiti

Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Department, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816asleiti@ucf.edu

J. S. Kapat

Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Department, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816

J. Turbomach 127(4), 659-667 (May 24, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2019276 History: Received May 05, 2004; Revised May 24, 2005

Prediction of flow field and heat transfer of high rotation numbers and density ratio flow in a square internal cooling channels of turbine blades with U-turn as tested by Wagner (ASME J. Turbomach., 113, pp. 42–51, 1991) is the main focus of this study. Rotation, buoyancy, and strong curvature affect the flow within these channels. Due to the fact that RSM turbulence model can respond to the effects of rotation, streamline curvature and anisotropy without the need for explicit modeling, it is employed for this study as it showed improved prediction compared to isotropic two-equation models. The near wall region was modeled using enhanced wall treatment approach. The Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) was validated against available experimental data (which are primarily at low rotation and buoyancy numbers). The model was then used for cases with high rotation numbers (as much as 1.29) and high-density ratios (up to 0.4). Particular attention is given to how secondary flow, velocity and temperature profiles, turbulence intensity, and Nusselt number area affected by Coriolis and buoyancy/centrifugal forces caused by high levels of rotation and buoyancy in the immediate vicinity of the bend. The results showed that four-side-average Nu, similar to low Ro cases, increases linearly by increasing rotation number and, unlike low Ro cases, decreases slightly by increasing density ratio.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Geometry for two pass square channel

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Figure 3

Predicted and measured, Wagner (3), Nusselt number ratios on the trailing surface for DR=0.13

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Figure 4

Secondary flow vectors

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Figure 5

Streamwise velocity profile in vertical direction

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Figure 6

Streamwise velocity profile in horizontal direction

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Figure 7

Temperature distribution

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Figure 8

Re shear stress components in vertical direction

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Figure 9

Reynolds shear stress components in horizontal direction

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Figure 10

Stream wise normal stress components in vertical direction

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Figure 11

W′W′ normal stress components

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Figure 12

Local Nusselt number ratio

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Figure 13

Average Nusselt number for DR=0.13

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Figure 14

Total pressure drop

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