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TECHNICAL BRIEF

Predicting Blade Stress Levels Directly From Reduced-Order Vibration Models of Mistuned Bladed Disks

[+] Author and Article Information
Sang-Ho Lim, Matthew P. Castanier

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125

Christophe Pierre1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125Pierre@umich.edu

1

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Turbomach 128(1), 206-210 (Aug 01, 2005) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2098754 History: Received February 23, 2005; Revised August 01, 2005

The forced vibration response of bladed disks can increase dramatically due to blade mistuning, which can cause major durability and reliability problems in turbine engines. To predict the mistuned forced response efficiently, several reduced-order modeling techniques have been developed. However, for mistuned bladed disks, increases in blade amplitude levels do not always correlate well with increases in blade stress levels. The stress levels may be computed by postprocessing the reduced-order model results with finite element analysis, but this is cumbersome and expensive. In this work, three indicators that can be calculated directly from reduced-order models are proposed as a way to estimate blade stress levels in a straightforward, systematic, and inexpensive manner. It is shown that these indicators can be used to predict stress values with good accuracy relative to finite element results, even for a case in which the displacement and stress levels show different frequency response trends.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Finite element mesh for an industrial rotor

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Figure 6

Mistuned forced response in the frequency range 32–36 kHz, where the 8th and 9th cantilevered-blade modes are dominant; (a) Euclidean displacement norm, (b) Von Mises stress

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Figure 5

Tuned forced response in the frequency range 32–36 kHz, where the 8th and 9th cantilevered-blade modes are dominant; (a) Euclidean displacement norm, (b) Von Mises stress

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Figure 4

Mistuned forced response in the frequency range 26–29 kHz, where the 7th cantilevered-blade mode is dominan

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Figure 3

Performance of normalized stress indicators in the 3rd flexural mode region; (a) using Euclidean norm, (b) using modal displacement, (c) using strain energy

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Figure 2

Performance of normalized stress indicators in the 2nd flexural mode region; (a) using Euclidean norm, (b) using modal displacement, (c) using strain energy

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