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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Effectiveness of a Serpentine Inlet Duct Flow Control Technique at Design and Off-Design Simulated Flight Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Angie Rabe Scribben1

Mechanical Engineering Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061

Wing Ng, Ricardo Burdisso

Mechanical Engineering Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061

1

Currently at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH.

J. Turbomach 128(2), 332-339 (Mar 01, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2098787 History: Received October 01, 2003; Revised March 01, 2004

An experimental investigation was conducted in a static ground test facility to determine the effectiveness of a serpentine inlet duct active flow control technique for two simulated flight conditions. The experiments used a scaled model of a compact, diffusing, serpentine, engine inlet duct developed by Lockheed Martin with a flow control technique using air injection through microjets at 1% of the inlet mass flow rate. The experimental results, in the form of total pressure measurements at the exit of the inlet, were used to predict the stability of a compression system through a parallel compressor model. The inlet duct was tested at cruise condition and angle of attack flight cases to determine the change in inlet performance due to flow control at different flight conditions. The experiments were run at an inlet throat Mach number of 0.55 and a resulting Reynolds number, based on the hydraulic diameter at the inlet throat, of 1.76*105. For both of the flight conditions tested, the flow control technique was found to reduce inlet distortion at the exit of the inlet by as much as 70% while increasing total pressure recovery by as much as 2%. The inlet total pressure profile was input in a parallel compressor model to predict the changes in stability margin of a compression system due to flow control for design and off-design flight conditions. Without flow control, both cases show a reduction in stability margin of 70%. With the addition of flow control, each case was able to recover a significant portion (up to 55%) of the undistorted stability margin. This flow control technique has improved the operating range of a compression system as compared to the same inlet duct without flow control.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of serpentine inlet duct flow separation

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Figure 2

Direction of vortices formed within a serpentine duct

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Figure 3

Compressor map with stability margin definition

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Figure 4

Parallel compressor concept

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Figure 5

Parallel compressor operating point analysis

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Figure 6

Schematic of inlet static ground test facility

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Figure 7

Experimental inlet duct

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Figure 8

Inlet throat total pressure CFD predictions ©Lockheed Martin. Used with permission.

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Figure 9

Angle of attack simulation setup

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Figure 10

Ring total pressure recovery example

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Figure 11

Stage 35 compressor map

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Figure 12

Angle of attack simulation throat total pressure profile

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Figure 13

AIP total pressure contours

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Figure 14

Effect of flow control of average pressure recovery for design and off-design points

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Figure 15

Effect of flow control on circumferential distortion for design and off-design points

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Figure 16

Effect of flow control on operating points for design and off-design conditions

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Figure 17

Effect of flow control on stability limits for design and off-design conditions

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Figure 18

Effect of flow control on stability margin for design and off-design points

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