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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Effects of Geometry on Brush Seal Pressure and Flow Fields—Part I: Front Plate Configurations

[+] Author and Article Information
Yahya Dogu1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kirikkale University, Yahsihan, Kirikkale 71451, Turkeyydogu@kku.edu.tr

Mahmut F. Aksit

Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanci University, Tuzla, Istanbul 34956, Turkeyaksit@sabanciuniv.edu

1

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Turbomach. 128(2), 367-378 (Jul 15, 2005) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2101857 History: Received January 14, 2005; Revised July 15, 2005

Pressure and flow fields lay at the basis of such common phenomena affecting brush seal performance as bristle flutter, blow-down, hang-up, hysteresis, pressure stiffening, wear, and leakage. Over the past two decades of brush seal evolution, manufacturers and researchers have applied many geometric configurations to the front and backing plates of a standard brush seal in order to control the flow field and consequent seal performance. The number of studies evaluating the effect of geometric configurations on the brush seal flow field remains limited in spite of the high number of filed patent disclosures. This study presents a numerical analysis of brush seal pressure and flow fields with regard to common conceptual front plate configurations. A CFD model has been employed to calculate pressure and flow fields in the seal domain. The model incorporates a bulk porous medium approach for the bristle pack. The effectiveness of various conceptual geometries has been outlined in terms of flow field formation. Results disclose unique effects of geometry on pressure and flow fields such that a longer front plate drives outward radial flow while playing a protective role against upstream cavity disturbances. Findings also indicate that variations in front plate geometry do not directly affect leakage performance. A long front plate or damper shim considerably changes the flow field while at the same time having limited effect on the pressure field. Moreover, a strong suction towards the clearance enhances inward radial flow in clearance operation.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of brush seal

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Figure 2

Front plate configurations

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Figure 3

Leakage evaluation for front plate configurations

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Figure 4

Axial pressure distribution on rotor surface

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Figure 5

Radial pressure distribution on backing plate

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Figure 6

Pressure (kPa) for contact operation

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Figure 7

Velocity vectors (m/s) for contact operation

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Figure 8

Radial velocity (m/s) for contact operation

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Figure 9

Axial velocity (m/s) for contact operation

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Figure 10

Turbulent kinetic energy (m2∕s2) for contact operation

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Figure 11

Pressure (kPa) for clearance operation

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Figure 12

Velocity vectors (m/s) for clearance operation

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Figure 13

Radial velocity (m/s) for clearance operation

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Figure 14

Axial velocity (m/s) for clearance operation

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Figure 15

Turbulent kinetic energy (m2∕s2) for clearance operation

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Figure 16

Flow properties in front of bristle pack: (a) pressure, (b) radial velocity, (c) axial velocity, and (d) turbulent kinetic energy

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