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RESEARCH PAPERS

The Effect of Wake Induced Structures on Compressor Boundary-Layers

[+] Author and Article Information
Andrew P. Wheeler1

Whittle Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK

Robert J. Miller, Howard P. Hodson

Whittle Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK

1

Corresponding author, and current address: Rolls-Royce Industrial Fellow, St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3UJ, UK. email: andrew.wheeler@eng.ox.ac.uk

J. Turbomach 129(4), 705-712 (Jul 31, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2720499 History: Received July 31, 2006; Revised July 31, 2006

The interaction of a convected wake with a compressor blade boundary layer was investigated. Measurements within a single-stage compressor were made using an endoscopic PIV system, a surface mounted pressure transducer, hotfilms and hotwire traverses, along with CFD simulations. The wake/leading-edge interaction was shown to lead to the formation of a thickened laminar boundary-layer, within which turbulent spots formed close to the leading edge. The thickened boundary-layer became turbulent and propagated down the blade surface, giving rise to pressure perturbations of 7% of the inlet dynamic head in magnitude. The results indicate that wake/leading-edge interactions have a crucial role to play in the performance of compressor blades in the presence of wakes.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

The Deverson rig and working section

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Figure 2

The stator-blade pressure distribution at midspan, at ϕ=0.51

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Figure 3

Computational mesh close to the leading edge

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Figure 4

Leading-edge time-average Cp distribution at midspan

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Figure 5

Leading-edge suction-surface Cp distribution with and without wake impingement, from the CFD solution

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Figure 6

Measured and predicted time-averaged boundary-layer profile at 6.7%S0

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Figure 7

Measured and predicted variation of H with time at 6.7%S0

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Figure 8

Measured and predicted variation of θ∕θm with time at 6.7%S0

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Figure 9

Measured variation of Reθ and Reθcrit based on the Mayle correlation (1), at 6.7%S0

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Figure 10

S-T plot of normalized ensemble-averaged vorticity (third normalization, ω***, see Eq. 4) at y∕c=0.046 above the suction surface

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Figure 11

S-T plot of the ensemble-averaged surface pressure perturbation ((p-pm)∕1∕2ρVinlet2)

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Figure 12

Contour plots of ensemble-average perturbation velocity (vp∕Vinlet) close to peak-suction at 3 rotor phase angles

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Figure 13

Contour plots of ensemble-average perturbation vorticity (ωp) and perturbation vector fields (Reynolds decomposition) at 4 rotor phase angles

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Figure 14

Raw traces of normalized quasishear stress (first normalization, τw*, see Eq. 2)

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Figure 15

S-T plot and schematic of ensemble-average normalized quasishear stress (second normalization, τw**, see Eq. 3) using the designation of states of (3)

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