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Research Papers

Control of Three-Dimensional Separations in Axial Compressors by Tailored Boundary Layer Suction

[+] Author and Article Information
Semiu A. Gbadebo

 Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln LN5 7FD, United Kingdom

Nicholas A. Cumpsty

 Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom

Tom P. Hynes

 University of Cambridge, Whittle Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0DY, United Kingdom

J. Turbomach. 130(1), 011004 (Dec 19, 2007) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2749294 History: Received November 18, 2005; Revised January 25, 2007; Published December 19, 2007

One of the important ways of improving turbomachinery compressor performance is to control three-dimensional (3D) separations, which form over the suction surface and end wall corner of the blade passage. Based on the insights gained into the formation of these separations, this paper illustrates how an appropriately applied boundary layer suction of up to 0.7% of inlet mass flow can control and eliminate typical compressor stator hub corner 3D separation over a range of operating incidence. The paper describes, using computational fluid dynamics, the application of suction on the blade suction surface and end wall boundary layers and exemplifies the influence of end wall dividing streamline in initiating 3D separation in the blade passage. The removal of the separated region from the blade suction surface is confirmed by an experimental investigation in a compressor cascade involving surface flow visualization, surface static pressure, and exit loss measurements. The ensuing passage flow field is characterized by increased blade loading (static pressure difference between pressure and suction surface), enhanced average static pressure rise, significant loss removal, and a uniform exit flow. This result also enables the contribution of the 3D separation to the overall loss and passage blockage to be assessed.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Computed suction surface and end wall limiting streamlines showing 3D separated surface flow pattern on the compressor cascade of PVD stators, i=0.0deg (S=saddle; N=nodes)

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Figure 2

Illustration of the suction slot configurations (not to scale) on the end wall and the blade suction surface: (a) EWA, (b) EWB, (c) SSA, and (d) SSB.

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Figure 3

Predicted limiting streamlines on the end wall and the blade suction surface of the cascade for the four suction slot configurations, i=0.0deg: (a) EWA, (b) EWB, (c) SSA, and (d) SSB

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Figure 4

Computed spanwise variation of the thickness of the separated layer at the trailing edge of the cascade for the four suction slot configurations, i=0.0deg

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Figure 5

Bleed characteristics for end wall slot configurations

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Figure 6

Suction surface tuft flow visualization with end wall suction EWB configuration, i=0.0deg

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Figure 7

Comparison of contours of measured exit total pressure loss for the compressor cascade with and without end wall dividing streamline suction, i=0.0deg

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Figure 8

(a) Measured and computed surface static pressure distribution near the end wall of the compressor cascade; datum and end wall suction EWB configuration (a) i=−7.0deg, (b) i=0.0deg, and (c) comparison of computed surface static pressure distribution at midspan and 89% span of the compressor cascade; datum and end wall suction EWB configuration, i=0.0deg

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Figure 9

Comparison of measured and computed exit flow angles of the compressor cascade for datum and end wall suction EWB configuration, i=0.0deg

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