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Research Papers

Numerical Investigation of a Transonic Centrifugal Compressor

[+] Author and Article Information
Michele Marconcini

“Sergio Stecco” Department of Energy Engineering, University of Florence, via di Santa Marta 3, 50139 Firenze, Italymichele.marconcini@arnone.de.unifi.it

Filippo Rubechini, Andrea Arnone

“Sergio Stecco” Department of Energy Engineering, University of Florence, via di Santa Marta 3, 50139 Firenze, Italy

Seiichi Ibaraki

Nagasaki R&D Center, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki 851-0392, Japan

J. Turbomach 130(1), 011010 (Jan 14, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2752186 History: Received November 02, 2006; Revised November 06, 2006; Published January 14, 2008

A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver is used to investigate the flow field of a high-pressure ratio centrifugal compressor for turbocharger applications. Such a compressor consists of a double-splitter impeller followed by a vaned diffuser. The inlet flow to the open shrouded impeller is transonic, thus giving rise to interactions between shock waves and boundary layers and between shock waves and tip leakage vortices. These interactions generate complex flow structures which are convected and distorted through the impeller blades. Detailed laser Doppler velocimetry flow measurements are available at various cross sections inside the impeller blades highlighting the presence of low-velocity flow regions near the shroud. Particular attention is focused on understanding the physical mechanisms which govern the flow phenomena in the near shroud region. To this end numerical investigations are performed using different tip clearance modelizations and various turbulence models, and their impact on the computed flow field is discussed.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The transonic impeller

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Figure 2

Cross section of compressor stage

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Figure 3

Meridional section of the impeller with measurement sections

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Figure 4

Three-dimensional view of the impeller computational mesh and schematics of mesh in the tip region: (a) impeller grid (blade-to-blade at mid-span); (b) modeled tip gap; and (c) gridded tip gap

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Figure 5

Streamwise distributions of isentropic Mach number at the shroud: (a); and (b)

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Figure 6

Pitchwise relative velocity distribution and contours in section D (BL model): (a) section D; (b) gridded tip gap; and (c) modeled tip gap

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Figure 7

Pitchwise relative velocity distribution and contours in section G (BL model): (a) section G; (b) gridded tip gap; and (c) modeled tip gap

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Figure 8

Comparison of pitchwise relative velocity distribution: (a) section A; (b) section B; (c) section C; (d) section D; (e) section E; (f) section F; (g) section G; and (h) section H

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Figure 9

Computed relative velocity contours near shroud at about 90% span (BL model)

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Figure 10

Tip leakage vortices, leakage, and secondary flows evolution in the impeller passages (BL model)

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