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Research Papers

Passive Shroud Cooling Concepts for HP Turbines: Experimental Investigations

[+] Author and Article Information
Vasudevan Kanjirakkad, Richard Thomas

Whittle Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0DY, United Kingdom

Howard Hodson

Whittle Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0DY, United Kingdomkpv20@cam.ac.uk

Erik Janke, Frank Haselbach

 Turbine Aerodynamics & Cooling, Rolls-Royce Deutschland, D-15827 Dahlewitz, Germany

Chris Whitney

 ALSTOM Power Technology Centre, Cambridge Road, Whetstone, Leicester LE8 6LH, United Kingdom

J. Turbomach 130(1), 011017 (Jan 28, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2749300 History: Received June 15, 2006; Revised January 11, 2007; Published January 28, 2008

The cooling of rotor shrouds in the first stage of a high-pressure turbine requires special attention as flatter turbine inlet temperature profiles and more highly loaded blades result in increased thermal and mechanical stresses. The use of film cooling and/or internal convective cooling makes the rotor shroud heavier and oversized, restricting the maximum rotational speed. Alternative methods are, therefore, sought to achieve improved cooling of the shroud. This paper discusses the low-speed experimental investigation of two “passive” cooling concepts known as “rail cooling” and “platform cooling.” It has been shown experimentally that the modified cooling method, namely, the platform cooling, substantially improves the rotor shroud coolant distribution in the critical areas while employing significantly lower amounts of coolant.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Low-speed turbine rig (with rail-cooling geometry)

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Figure 2

Blades: (a) stator and (b) rotor

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Figure 3

(a) Intershroud gap and (b) rotor blade instrumentation

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Figure 4

Ammonia-diazo calibration plot

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Figure 5

Rail-cooling geometry/concept

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Figure 6

Stator exit radial velocity contours: (a) without coolant and (b) with coolant

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Figure 7

Schematic of the shroud inlet cavity vortex: (a) without coolant and (b) with coolant

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Figure 8

Contours of relative coolant concentration at stator/coolant exit cavity (rail cooling)

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Figure 9

Contours of adiabatic cooling effectiveness on the shroud underside surface (rail cooling)

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Figure 10

Contours of adiabatic cooling effectiveness on the shroud/blade suction side surface (rail cooling)

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Figure 11

Contours of adiabatic cooling effectiveness on the shroud/blade pressure side surface (rail cooling)

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Figure 12

Contours of adiabatic cooling effectiveness on the shroud top surfaces (rail cooling)

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Figure 13

Platform-cooling geometry/concept

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Figure 14

Stator exit radial velocity contours with coolant ejected through the platform-cooling holes

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Figure 15

Contours of relative coolant concentration at stator/ coolant exit cavity (platform cooling)

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Figure 16

Contours of adiabatic cooling effectiveness on the shroud underside surface (platform cooling)

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Figure 17

Contours of adiabatic cooling effectiveness on the shroud/blade suction side surface (platform cooling)

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Figure 18

Contours of adiabatic cooling effectiveness on the shroud/blade pressure side surface (platform cooling)

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Figure 19

Contours of adiabatic cooling effectiveness on the shroud top surfaces (platform cooling)

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