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Research Papers

The Effect of Vane Clocking on the Unsteady Flow Field in a One-and-a-Half Stage Transonic Turbine

[+] Author and Article Information
O. Schennach, R. Pecnik, E. Göttlich, A. Marn

Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery and Machine Dynamics, Graz University of Technology, Graz 8010, Austria

B. Paradiso

 Laboratorio di Fluidodinamica delle Macchine, Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy

J. Woisetschläger

Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery and Machine Dynamics, Graz University of Technology, Graz 8010, Austriajakob.woisetschlaeger@tugraz.at

J. Turbomach 130(3), 031022 (May 07, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2777199 History: Received June 08, 2007; Revised June 20, 2007; Published May 07, 2008

The current paper presents the results of numerical and experimental clocking investigations performed in a high-pressure transonic turbine with a downstream vane row. The objective was a detailed analysis of shock and wake interactions in such a 1.5-stage machine while clocking the vanes. Therefore, a transient 3D Navier–Stokes calculation was done for two clocking positions, and the three-dimensional results are compared with laser-Doppler-velocimetry measurements at midspan. Additionally, the second vane was equipped with fast response pressure transducers to record the instantaneous surface pressure for 20 different clocking positions at midspan.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Meridional flow path with LDV measurement positions in planes C and D1. In planes A and D3, probes were placed (measurement positions indicated by dots).

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Figure 2

LDV measurement positions at midspan together with the CP investigated (CP1–CP10)

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Figure 3

Static pressure taps at midspan; additionally, measurement locations 1, 4, and 15 were equipped with fast response pressure transducers

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Figure 4

Computational grid. The picture shows the surface mesh of the computational grid used for CFD. The fillets between blade-hub and blade–outer-casing and the rotor blade clearance are meshed to match the geometrical details of the test turbine facility.

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Figure 5

Comparison of CFD (left) and LDV (right): Time-averaged and maximum-minimum envelope of the velocity magnitude for (a) CP1 and (b) CP6 (optimum CP); plane C, line 1, 3mm upstream the second vane

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Figure 6

Comparison of CFD (left) and LDV (right): Time-averaged velocity magnitude and maximum-minimum envelope of the velocity magnitude for (a) CP1 and (b) CP6; plane D, line 1, 10mm downstream of the second vane

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Figure 7

Contour plot of radial vorticity and isolines of pressure gradient magnitude for (a) CP1 and (b) CP6 obtained by CFD

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Figure 8

Steady surface-pressure distribution for CP1 and CP6 at midspan

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Figure 9

Second vane pressure fluctuations at three different measurement locations at midspan for different CPs. These fluctuations are compared to the relative efficiency at midspan. Time is given in terms of blade passing period.

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Figure 10

Pressure fluctuations on the suction side transducer for CP1 and CP6

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