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Research Papers

On the Coupling of Inverse Design and Optimization Techniques for the Multiobjective, Multipoint Design of Turbomachinery Blades

[+] Author and Article Information
Duccio Bonaiuti

 Advanced Design Technology Ltd., Monticello House, 45 Russell Square, London WC1B 4JP, United Kingdom

Mehrdad Zangeneh

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE, United Kingdom

J. Turbomach 131(2), 021014 (Jan 29, 2009) (16 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2950065 History: Received June 25, 2007; Revised October 11, 2007; Published January 29, 2009

Automatic optimization techniques have been used in recent years for the aerodynamic and mechanical design of turbomachine components. Despite the many advantages, their use is usually limited to simple applications in industrial practice, because of their high computational cost. In this paper, an optimization strategy is presented, which enables the three-dimensional multipoint, multiobjective aerodynamic optimization of turbomachinery blades in a time frame compatible with industrial standards. The design strategy is based on the coupling of three-dimensional inverse design, response surface method, multiobjective evolutionary algorithms, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. The blade parametrization is performed by means of a three-dimensional inverse design method, where aerodynamic parameters, such as the blade loading, are used to describe the blade shape. Such a parametrization allows for a direct control of the aerodynamic flow field and performance, leading to a major advantage in the optimization process. The design method was applied to the redesign of a centrifugal and of an axial compressor stage. The two examples confirmed the validity of the design strategy to perform the three-dimensional optimization of turbomachine components, accounting for both design and off-design performance, in a time-efficient manner. The coupling of response functions and inverse design parametrization also allowed for an easy sensitivity analysis of the impact of the design parameters on the performance ones, contributing to the development of design guidelines that can be exploited for similar design applications.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Response surface model building scheme

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Figure 2

Sketch of the centrifugal compressor stage

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Figure 3

Blade loading parametrization

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Figure 4

Stacking parametrization

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Figure 5

Meridional channel parametrization

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Figure 6

3D view of the compressor grid

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Figure 7

Pareto front of the first analysis

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Figure 8

Pareto front of the second analysis

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Figure 9

Comparison of the meridional contour and blade loading distribution between the baseline and final design

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Figure 10

Comparison of the baseline and final design efficiency curves (CFD analysis)

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Figure 11

Secondary flow on the blade pressure side at design point

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Figure 12

Secondary flow on the blade suction side at design point

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Figure 13

Secondary flow on the tip section at design point

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Figure 14

Main effect of blade loading and stacking parameters on the peak and stall efficiencies (a) and the choke margin (b)

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Figure 15

Main effects of the meridional channel parameters on peak and stall efficiencies (a) and choke margin (b)

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Figure 16

Effect of hub leading edge loading on the blade distribution of the reduced pressure coefficient at design point

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Figure 17

Sketch of the HP9 axial compressor stage

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Figure 18

(a) Blade loading parametrization; (b) inter-row RVθ parametrization

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Figure 19

3D view of the computational grid

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Figure 20

Effect of the design parameters on the rotor efficiency

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Figure 21

Effect of the design parameters on the stator loss coefficient

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Figure 22

Effect of the design parameters on the stage efficiency

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Figure 23

Effect of the design parameters on the rotor work coefficient

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Figure 24

Comparison of the stator loss coefficient curve between two configurations differing only for the rotor loading

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Figure 25

Pareto front of the axial compressor analysis

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Figure 26

Comparison of the blade loading distributions between baseline and final design

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Figure 27

Comparison of the rotor blade pressure distribution between baseline and final design

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Figure 28

Comparison of the compressor performance between baseline and final design

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Figure 29

Mach number distribution and velocity vectors on the hub trailing-edge region of the rotor suction side

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