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Research Papers

Surface Shear Stress and Pressure Measurements in a Turbine Cascade

[+] Author and Article Information
Brian M. Holley

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, U-3139 Storrs, CT 06269bmholley@engr.uconn.edu

Lee S. Langston

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Road, U-3139 Storrs, CT 06269langston@engr.uconn.edu

J. Turbomach 131(3), 031014 (Apr 10, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2988168 History: Received May 08, 2008; Revised July 22, 2008; Published April 10, 2009

To further the understanding of secondary flow loss, a set of surface measurements is presented for a planar turbine cascade tested at low Mach number (maximum of 0.23) and at an inlet axial chord Reynolds number of 5.9×105. The endwall and airfoil surface measurements are of skin friction, limiting streamline direction, and static pressure. An oil film interferometry measurement technique applied to the endwall and airfoil surfaces (at some 2000 locations) provides an extensive passage surface map of skin friction values and limiting streamline topology. Measurements of pressures on the same passage surfaces are also presented, resulting in a complete picture of endwall and airfoil surface pressure and shear.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 9

New and 1977 midspan static pressure measurements for airfoil 2 along with the potential flow solution

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Figure 8

Cat’s eyes on the endwall around the trailing edge of the airfoil, qualitatively resolved with the OFI technique

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Figure 7

Airfoil measurements: (a) limiting streamlines, (b) skin friction coefficient, (c) static pressure coefficient, and (d) Stanton number (3)

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Figure 6

Endwall measurements: (a) limiting streamlines, (b) skin friction coefficient, (c) static pressure coefficient (2), and (d) Stanton number (3)

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Figure 5

Midspan static pressure measurements for airfoils 2 and 3 along with the potential flow solution

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Figure 4

Schematic of the large-scale plane turbine cascade. Lengths are scaled by axial chord bx.

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Figure 3

Development of measured mass-averaged total pressure coefficient through the cascade

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Figure 2

The three-dimensional separation of a boundary layer entering a planar turbine cascade (from Langston (4))

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Figure 1

Photograph of light interference patterns in silicone oil films on the suction side of an airfoil surface

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