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Research Papers

Film-Cooling Flowfields With Trenched Holes on an Endwall

[+] Author and Article Information
N. Sundaram

 Creative Power Solutions USA, Inc., 11010 North Saguaro Boulevard, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268sundar.narayan@cpsusainc.net

K. A. Thole

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania University, University Park, PA 16802

J. Turbomach 131(4), 041007 (Jul 01, 2009) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3068316 History: Received August 19, 2008; Revised August 27, 2008; Published July 01, 2009

The leading edge region along the endwall of a stator vane experiences high heat transfer rates resulting from the formation of horseshoe vortices. Typical gas turbine endwall designs include a leakage slot at the combustor-turbine interface as well as film-cooling holes. Past studies have documented the formation of a horseshoe vortex at the leading edge of a vane, but few studies have documented the flowfield in the presence of an interface slot and film-cooling jets. In this paper, a series of flowfield measurements is evaluated at the leading edge with configurations including a baseline with neither film-cooling holes nor an upstream slot, a row of film-cooling holes and an interface slot, and a row of film-cooling holes in a trench and an interface slot. The results indicated the formation of a second vortex present for the case with film-cooling holes and a slot relative to the baseline study. In addition, turbulence intensity levels as high as 50% were measured at the leading edge with film-cooling holes and a slot compared with the 30% measured for the baseline study. A trench was shown to provide improved overall cooling relative to the no trench configuration as more of the coolant stayed attached to the endwall surface with the trench.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 4

Boundary layer profiles comparing the current study with Kang (22)

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Figure 5

Variation of the streamwise velocity approaching the vane stagnation location

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Figure 6

Contours of adiabatic effectiveness levels comparing the effect of (a) film-cooling holes without a trench and (b) film-cooling holes with a trench

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Figure 7

Area-averaged effectiveness comparing the effect of a trench on leading edge film-cooling

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Figure 8

Comparison of leading edge flowfield superimposed with the streamwise velocity for (a) Kang (22), (b) baseline, (c) film-cooling holes without a trench at M=2.5, and (d) film-cooling with a trench at M=2.5

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Figure 9

Velocity profiles showing the spanwise variation of (a) U- and (b) W-velocity components

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Figure 10

Comparison of (a) streamwise, (b) spanwise, and (c) pitchwise turbulence levels at the endwall leading edge

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Figure 11

Contours comparing the normalized turbulence kinetic energy for (a) Kang (22), (b) baseline, (c) film-cooling holes without a trench at M=2.5, and (d) film-cooling holes with a trench at M=2.5

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Figure 12

Profiles comparing the normalized kinetic energy at the endwall leading edge

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Figure 13

Comparison of normalized vorticity at the stagnation plane for (a) Kang (22), (b) baseline, (c) film-cooling holes without a trench at M=2.5, and (d) film-cooling holes with a trench at M=2.5

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Figure 1

Illustration of the wind tunnel facility

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Figure 2

Illustrates the endwall design studied at the leading edge

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Figure 3

Illustrates the three-endwall configurations: (a) baseline, (b) film-cooling without a trench, and (c) film-cooling with a trench studied at the leading edge

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