0
Research Papers

Design and Optimization of the Internal Cooling Channels of a High Pressure Turbine Blade—Part I: Methodology

[+] Author and Article Information
Sergio Amaral1

Department of Aerospace Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, 229 Hammond Building, University Park, PA 16802sergio.amaral@ge.com

Tom Verstraete

Department of Turbomachinery and Propulsion, von Kármán Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Waterloosesteenweg 72, 640 Sint-Genesius-Rode, Belgiumtom.verstraete@vki.ac.be

René Van den Braembussche

Department of Turbomachinery and Propulsion, von Kármán Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Waterloosesteenweg 72, 640 Sint-Genesius-Rode, Belgiumvdb@vki.ac.be

Tony Arts

Department of Turbomachinery and Propulsion, von Kármán Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Waterloosesteenweg 72, 640 Sint-Genesius-Rode, Belgiumarts@vki.ac.be

1

Present address: GE Infra Energy, Greenville, SC.

J. Turbomach 132(2), 021013 (Jan 13, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3104614 History: Received September 30, 2008; Revised November 19, 2008; Published January 13, 2010; Online January 13, 2010

This first paper describes the conjugate heat transfer (CHT) method and its application to the performance and lifetime prediction of a high pressure turbine blade operating at a very high inlet temperature. It is the analysis tool for the aerothermal optimization described in a second paper. The CHT method uses three separate solvers: a Navier–Stokes solver to predict the nonadiabatic external flow and heat flux, a finite element analysis (FEA) to compute the heat conduction and stress within the solid, and a 1D aerothermal model based on friction and heat transfer correlations for smooth and rib-roughened cooling channels. Special attention is given to the boundary conditions linking these solvers and to the stability of the complete CHT calculation procedure. The Larson–Miller parameter model is used to determine the creep-to-rupture failure lifetime of the blade. This model requires both the temperature and thermal stress inside the blade, calculated by the CHT and FEA. The CHT method is validated on two test cases: a gas turbine rotor blade without cooling and one with five cooling channels evenly distributed along the camber line. The metal temperature and thermal stress distribution in both blades are presented and the impact of the cooling channel geometry on lifetime is discussed.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Cooling channel friction enhancement factor

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

von Mises stress distribution for the blade without cooling channels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

von Mises stress distribution for the blade with cooling channels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Effective stress distribution at rupture (l=161 h) for the blade without cooling channels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Effective stress distribution at rupture (l=220 h) for the blade with cooling channels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Effective stress distribution at rupture (l=9.8 h), computed with total stress for the blade without cooling channels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Effective stress distribution at rupture (l=17.7 h), computed with total stress for the blade with cooling channels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Temperature distribution for the blade with cooling channels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Temperature distribution for the blade without cooling channels

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Blade tip pressure distribution

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Exposed view on rotor blade model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Cooling channel heat transfer enhancement factor

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Related

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In