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Research Papers

3D Numerical Investigation of Tandem Airfoils for a Core Compressor Rotor

[+] Author and Article Information
Jonathan McGlumphy1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061jmcglump@vt.edu

Wing-Fai Ng

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061wng@vt.edu

Steven R. Wellborn

 Rolls-Royce plc, Derby, England DE73 5AHsteven.wellborn@rolls-royce.com

Severin Kempf

Compressor and Fan Aerodynamic Design, Rolls-Royce Corp., Indianapolis, IN 46206severin.g.kempf@rolls-royce.com

1

Present address: Synchrony, Inc., 4655 Technology Drive, Salem, VA 24153.

J. Turbomach 132(3), 031009 (Mar 25, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3149283 History: Received September 29, 2008; Revised January 28, 2009; Published March 25, 2010; Online March 25, 2010

The tandem airfoil has potential to do more work as a compressor blade than a single airfoil without incurring higher losses. The goal of this work is to evaluate the fluid mechanics of a tandem rotor in the rear stages of a core compressor. As such, the results are constrained to shock-free fully turbulent flow with thick endwall boundary layers at the inlet. A high hub-to-tip ratio 3D blade geometry was developed based on the best-case tandem airfoil configuration from a previous 2D study. The 3D tandem rotor was simulated in isolation, in order to scrutinize the fluid mechanisms of the rotor, which had not been previously well documented. A geometrically similar single blade rotor was also simulated under the same conditions for a baseline comparison. The tandem rotor was found to outperform its single blade counterpart by attaining a higher work coefficient, polytropic efficiency, and numerical stall margin. An examination of the tandem rotor fluid mechanics revealed that the forward blade acts in a similar manner to a conventional rotor. The aft blade is strongly dependent on the flow it receives from the forward blade, and tends to be more three-dimensional and nonuniform than the forward blade.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Tandem blade geometrical parameters

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Figure 2

2D CFD results of single and best-case tandem airfoil from Ref. 3

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Figure 3

Selected single blade compressor and tandem rotor design points

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Figure 4

Tandem (L) and single rotor (R) 2D profiles

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Figure 5

Tandem rotor CFD mesh (profile view)

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Figure 6

Tandem rotor inlet total pressure profile

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Figure 7

Tandem and single rotor 100% speed performance characteristics

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Figure 8

Forward blade incidence

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Figure 9

Forward blade deviation

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Figure 10

Forward blade losses

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Figure 11

Aft blade incidence

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Figure 12

Aft blade deviation

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Figure 13

Aft blade losses

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Figure 14

Suction surface radial velocity contours

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Figure 15

Tandem rotor flow passage with streamlines seeded near the hub

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Figure 16

Entropy contours at forward blade/aft blade interface looking upstream

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Figure 17

Entropy contours at aft blade trailing edge looking upstream

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Figure 18

Blade loading distributions

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