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Research Papers

Volume Dynamics Propulsion System Modeling for Supersonics Vehicle Research

[+] Author and Article Information
George Kopasakis

 NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Mail Stop 77-1, Cleveland, OH 44135gkopasakis@nasa.gov

Joseph W. Connolly, Daniel E. Paxson

 NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Mail Stop 77-1, Cleveland, OH 44135

Peter Ma

 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611

J. Turbomach 132(4), 041003 (Apr 26, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3192148 History: Received June 30, 2008; Revised February 04, 2009; Published April 26, 2010; Online April 26, 2010

Under the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program, the Supersonics Project is working to overcome the obstacles to supersonic commercial flight. The proposed vehicles are long, slim body aircrafts with pronounced aeroservoelastic modes. These modes can potentially couple with propulsion system dynamics, leading to performance challenges such as aircraft ride quality and stability. Other disturbances upstream of the engine generated from atmospheric wind gusts, angle of attack, and yaw can have similar effects. In addition, for optimal propulsion system performance, normal inlet-engine operations are required to be closer to compressor stall and inlet unstart. To study these phenomena, an integrated model is needed that includes both airframe structural dynamics and the propulsion system dynamics. This paper covers the propulsion system component volume dynamics modeling of a turbojet engine that will be used for an integrated vehicle aeropropulsoservoelastic model and for propulsion efficiency studies.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Schematic of nth compressor stage

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Figure 3

Overall compressor pressure ratio map

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Figure 4

Overall compressor efficiency map

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Figure 5

Combustor efficiency representation

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Figure 6

Overall turbine pressure ratio map

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Figure 7

Overall turbine efficiency map

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Figure 8

Comparison of engine simulation and experimental results for compressor pressure due to fuel response

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Figure 9

Comparison of engine simulation and experimental results for combustor pressure due to fuel response

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Figure 10

Step response of engine speed due to fuel

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Figure 11

Step response of combustor pressure to fuel

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Figure 12

Step response of turbine temperature to fuel

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Figure 13

Step response of combustor pressure to engine input total pressure

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Figure 14

Step response of turbine total pressure to engine input total pressure

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Figure 15

Step response of compressor total temperature to engine input total temperature

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Figure 16

Step response of turbine total temperature to engine input total temperature

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Figure 17

Frequency response of engine thrust due to engine input total pressure with different afterburner lengths

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