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Research Papers

An Integrated System for the Aerodynamic Design of Compression Systems—Part II: Application

[+] Author and Article Information
Tiziano Ghisu1

Engineering Design Centre, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, CB2 1PZ, UKtg269@cam.ac.uk

Geoffrey T. Parks, Jerome P. Jarrett, P. John Clarkson

Engineering Design Centre, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, CB2 1PZ, UK

1

Corresponding author.

J. Turbomach 133(1), 011012 (Sep 21, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000535 History: Received January 10, 2009; Revised July 21, 2009; Published September 21, 2010; Online September 21, 2010

The complexity of modern gas turbine engines has led to the adoption of a modular design approach, in which a conceptual design phase fixes the values for a number of parameters and dimensions in order to facilitate the subdivision of the overall task into a number of simpler design problems. While making the overall problem more tractable, the introduction of these process-intrinsic constraints (such as flow areas and radii between adjacent stages) at a very early phase of the design process can limit the level of performance achievable, neglecting important regions of the design space and concealing important trade-offs between different modules or disciplines. While this approach has worked satisfactorily in the past, the continuous increase in components’ efficiencies and performance makes further advances more difficult to achieve. Part I of this paper described the development of a system for the integrated design optimization of gas turbine engines: postponing the setting of the interface constraints to a point where more information is available facilitates better exploration of the available design space and better exploitation of the trade-offs between different disciplines and modules. In this second part of the paper, the proposed approach is applied to several test cases from the design of a three-spool gas turbine engine core compression system, demonstrating the risks associated with a modular design approach and the consistent gains achievable through the proposed integrated optimization approach.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Dependence of the Pareto front for the isolated IPC optimization (Table 1) on the constraints imposed at the exit plane

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Figure 2

Pareto fronts for the system of IPC and duct (Table 2)

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Figure 3

Comparison of optimal geometries for the maximum efficiency designs obtained for the isolated IPC and integrated IPC/duct optimizations: (a) IPC and duct, (b) close-up view of the interface

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Figure 4

Comparison of optimal geometries for the larger surge margin designs obtained for the isolated IPC and integrated IPC/duct optimizations: (a) IPC and duct, (b) close-up view of the interface

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Figure 5

Results from the integrated optimization of the core compression system (Table 3)

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Figure 6

Results from the optimization of the core compression system with fixed interfaces between modules (Table 3)

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Figure 7

Comparison between the results of integrated and traditional optimization approaches (system efficiency improvement contour plots as a function of the improvements in IPC and HPC surge margins): (a) integrated optimization, (b) fixed interfaces

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Figure 8

Results from the integrated core compression system optimization (Table 3) for different numbers of IPC stages (alternative views)

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Figure 9

Results from the integrated core compression system optimization (Table 3) for different numbers of IPC stages (system efficiency improvement contour plots as a function of the improvements in IPC and HPC surge margins): (a) 7 stages, (b) 6 stages

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