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Research Papers

Effect of Wake-Disturbed Flow on Heat (Mass) Transfer to a Turbine Blade

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Olson

 Sterilucent Inc., Minneapolis, MN 55413steven.olson@sterilucent.com

S. Sanitjai

Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology, Thonburi, Bangkok 10140, Thailandsurachaikmutt@yahoo.co.th

K. Ghosh

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Heat Transfer Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455kalmech@me.umn.edu

R. J. Goldstein1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Heat Transfer Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455rjg@me.umn.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Turbomach 133(1), 011015 (Sep 22, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000538 History: Received April 09, 2009; Revised July 31, 2009; Published September 22, 2010; Online September 22, 2010

This study investigates the effect of wakes in the presence of varying levels of background freestream turbulence on the heat (mass) transfer from gas turbine blades. Measurements using the naphthalene sublimation technique provide local values of the mass transfer coefficient on the pressure and suction surfaces of a simulated turbine blade in a linear cascade. Experimental parameters studied include the pitch of the wake-generating blades (vanes), blade-row separation, Reynolds number, and the freestream turbulence level. The disturbed flow strongly affects the mass transfer Stanton number on both sides of the blade, particularly along the suction surface. An earlier transition to a turbulent boundary layer occurs with increased background turbulence, higher Reynolds number, and from wakes shed from vanes placed upstream of the linear cascade. Note that once the effects on mass transfer are known, similar variation on heat transfer can be inferred from the heat/mass transfer analogy.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Top view of the test-section

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Figure 2

Wake and cascade dimensions

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Figure 3

Wake velocity and turbulence intensity profiles downstream of vane

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Figure 4

Nondimensionalized wake velocity profiles downstream of vane

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Figure 5

Wake shedding Strouhal numbers downstream of the vane

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Figure 6

Average Sherwood number variation in the two-dimensional region for various wakes

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Figure 7

Average Sherwood number variation in the two-dimensional region for single and multiple wakes (Reex=5.4×105)

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Figure 8

Average Sherwood number variation in the two-dimensional region for three blade-row separations (Reex=5.4×105)

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Figure 9

Average Sherwood number variation in the two-dimensional region for 0.2% and 3.0% freestream turbulences (Reex=5.0×105)

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Figure 10

Average Sherwood number variation in the two-dimensional region for increased Reynolds number

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