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Research Papers

A Turbomachinery Design Tool for Teaching Design Concepts for Axial-Flow Fans, Compressors, and Turbines

[+] Author and Article Information
Mark G. Turner

Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Cincinnati, PO. Box 210070 Cincinnati, OH 45221mark.turner@uc.edu

Ali Merchant

 CADNexus Inc., Arlington, MA 02476merchant@cadnexus.com

Dario Bruna

 NASA GRC, Cleveland, OH 44142dariobruna@fastwebnet.it

J. Turbomach 133(3), 031017 (Nov 18, 2010) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001240 History: Received September 22, 2009; Revised December 31, 2009; Published November 18, 2010; Online November 18, 2010

A new turbomachinery design system, T-AXI, is described and demonstrated. It is intended primarily for use by educators and students, although it is sophisticated enough for actual designs. The codes, example cases, and user’s manual are available through the authors’ websites. The design system can be used to design multistage compressors and turbines from a small number of physical design parameters. Students can understand the connection between these physical parameters such as the Mach number and flow angles to the cross sectional area and angular momentum. There is also a clear connection between the angular momentum, work, and blade loadings. Loss models are built-in and results are compared against tested geometries. The code also has a built-in blade geometry generator, and the geometry can be the output for running the MISES blade-to-blade solver on each section or visualizing the blades. A single stage compressor from the U.S. Air Force Stage Matching Investigation rig, the 10 stage NASA/GE EEE high pressure compressor, and the NASA/GE EEE 5 stage low pressure turbine have been used to validate T-AXI as a design tool.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic for T-AXI turbomachinery design system

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Figure 2

Stage matching investigation rig cross section (20)

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Figure 3

SMI measured overall stage characteristic for the “clean” inlet and 40 wake generator configurations (20)

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Figure 4

T-AXI screens during the solution of the one stage design. Graphics are used to check input and some guidance on solution convergence. Angular momentum is the primary input downstream of each blade row. It is uniform for this free-vortex design.

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Figure 5

3D representation of the one stage design. The blade viewer program can output all the blades of a design.

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Figure 6

T-AXI screens during the solution of the SMI case derived from the 3D simulation. This solution had contoured leading and trailing edges as well as profiles of angular momentum.

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Figure 7

Comparison of the one stage flowpath generated with T-C_DES and the SMI geometry. Also shown are the leading edge and trailing edge stations.

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Figure 8

GE EEE high pressure compressor

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Figure 9

T-AXI screens during the solution of the ten stage design. Graphics are used to check input and help guide solution convergence. Angular momentum is the primary input downstream of each blade row. It is uniform for this free-vortex design.

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Figure 10

T-AXI screens during the solution of the EEE full geometry. This solution had contoured leading and trailing edges as well as profiles of angular momentum as defined by the axisymmetric output in the EEE report.

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Figure 11

Comparison of the ten stage flowpath generated with T-C_DES and the EEE design. Also shown are the rotor 1 leading edge and stator 10 trailing edge.

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Figure 12

Blade design features. The output of geometry and MISES files allows MISES to be run without changing files. With a small modification of the files, a coupled boundary layer can be run or a mixed-inverse can allow a blade row section to be redesigned.

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Figure 13

3D representation of the ten stage design. The blade viewer program can output all the blades of a design.

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Figure 14

GE EEE LP turbine flowpath (26)

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Figure 15

Initial grid for the five stage EEE LPT also showing the leading and trailing edge stations

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Figure 16

T-AXI screen during the solution of the five stage EEE LPT

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Figure 17

3D representation of the five stage LPT analyzed. Blades were generated with 5% max thickness to chord ratio.

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Figure 18

Comparison of the flowpath generated with T-T_DES using the stage input parameters compared with the actual EEE 5 stage flowpath

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