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Research Papers

Simulations of Multiphase Particle Deposition on a Showerhead With Staggered Film-Cooling Holes

[+] Author and Article Information
Seth A. Lawson

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering,  The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PAseth.lawson@contr.netl.doe.gov

Karen A. Thole

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering,  The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PAkthole@engr.psu.edu

Yoji Okita

IHI Corporation,Aero-engine & Space operations, 229, Tonogaya, Mizuho-machi, Nishitama-gun, Tokyo, Japanyouji_ookita@ihi.co.jp

Chiyuki Nakamata

IHI Corporation,Aero-engine & Space operations, 229, Tonogaya, Mizuho-machi, Nishitama-gun, Tokyo, Japanchiyuki_nakamata@ihi.co.jp

J. Turbomach 134(5), 051041 (Jun 05, 2012) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004757 History: Received July 18, 2011; Revised July 20, 2011; Published June 05, 2012; Online June 05, 2012

The demand for cleaner, more efficient energy has driven the motivation for improving the performance standards for gas turbines. Increasing the combustion temperature is one way to get the best possible performance from a gas turbine. One problem associated with increased combustion temperatures is that particles ingested in the fuel and air become more prone to deposition with an increase in turbine inlet temperature. Deposition on aero-engine turbine components caused by sand particle ingestion can impair turbine cooling methods and lead to reduced component life. It is necessary to understand the extent to which particle deposition affects turbine cooling in the leading edge region of the nozzle guide vane where intricate showerhead cooling geometries are utilized. For the current study, wax was used to dynamically simulate multiphase particle deposition on a large scale showerhead cooling geometry. The effects of deposition development, coolant blowing ratio, and particle temperature were tested. Infrared thermography was used to quantify the effects of deposition on cooling effectiveness. Although deposition decreased with an increase in coolant blowing ratio, results showed that reductions in cooling effectiveness caused by deposition increased with an increase in blowing ratio. Results also showed that effectiveness reduction increased with an increase in particle temperature. Reductions in cooling effectiveness reached as high as 36% at M = 1.0.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Illustration of wind tunnel facility

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Figure 2

Schematic illustrating the cylindrical leading edge and aft body dimensions

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Figure 3

Schematic showing (a) measured velocity profile, (b) test section top view, and (c) test section side view

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Figure 4

Measured and theoretical dimensionless pressure distributions around the cylinder leading edge

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Figure 5

Wax particle generator and photograph of injection nozzle

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Figure 6

Particle size histograms at an atomizing air pressure of 70 kPa and various liquid wax pressures

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Figure 7

Adiabatic effectiveness contours at (a) M = 0.5, (b) M = 1.0, and (c) M = 1.8 with no deposition

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Figure 8

Spanwise-averaged effectiveness for the baseline film-cooling tests with no deposition

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Figure 9

Adiabatic effectiveness contours and deposition photographs of the showerhead at M = 1.0 (a) before deposition, (b) after 100 g, (c) after 200 g, and (d) after 300 g of wax injection at TSP = 1.0

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Figure 10

Enlargements of deposition photographs taken at different wax injections at M = 1.0

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Figure 11

Spanwise-averaged effectiveness before deposition and after 100, 200, and 300 g of wax injection at M = 1.0 and TSP = 1.0

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Figure 12

Average circumferential deposition depth after 100, 200, and 300 g of wax injection at M = 1.0 and TSP = 1.0

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Figure 13

Area-averaged effectiveness plotted with respect to mass of injected wax at M = 1.0 and TSP = 1.0

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Figure 14

Adiabatic effectiveness contours (a) before deposition and (b) after 300 g of wax injection at TSP = 1.0 and (c) deposition photographs at M = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.8

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Figure 15

Midspan deposition photographs at (a) M = 0.5, (b) M = 1.0, and (c) M = 1.8 with TSP = 1.0

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Figure 16

Spanwise-averaged local effectiveness reduction for all blowing ratios at TSP = 1.0

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Figure 17

Effectiveness reduction with respect to blowing ratio for all cases tested

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Figure 18

Nondimensional deposition thickness at all three blowing ratios after 300 g at TSP = 1.0

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Figure 19

Adiabatic effectiveness contours and deposition photographs for M = 1.0 (a) with no deposition, (b) after 300 g at TSP = 1.0, and (c) after 300 g at TSP = 2.0

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Figure 20

Spanwise-averaged effectiveness plots at M = 1.0 illustrating effects of TSP

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