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Research Papers

Effect of Inlet Skew on Heat/Mass Transfer From a Simulated Turbine Blade

[+] Author and Article Information
Kalyanjit Ghosh1 n2

Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455kalmech@me.umn.edu

R. J. Goldstein

Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455rjg@me.umn.edu

1

Present address: GE Global Research, Bangalore, India.

2

Corresponding author.

J. Turbomach 134(5), 051042 (Jun 15, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004816 History: Received June 21, 2011; Revised July 09, 2011; Published June 15, 2012; Online June 15, 2012

Heat (mass) transfer experiments are conducted to study the effect of an inlet skew on a simulated gas-turbine blade placed in a linear cascade. The inlet skew simulates the relative motion between rotor and stator endwalls in a single turbine stage. The transverse motion of a belt, placed parallel to and upstream of the turbine cascade, generates the inlet skew. With the freestream velocity constant at approximately 16 m/s, which results in a Reynolds number (based on the blade chord length of 0.184 m) of 1.8 × 105 , a parametric study was conducted for three belt-to-freestream velocity ratios. The distribution of the Sherwood number on the suction surface of the blade shows that the inlet skew intensifies the generation of the horseshoe vortex close to the endwall region. This is associated with the development of a stronger passage vortex for a higher velocity ratio, which causes an earlier transition to turbulence. Corresponding higher mass transfer coefficients are measured between the midheight of the blade and the endwall, at a midchord downstream location. However, a negligible variation in transport properties is measured above the two-dimensional region of the blade at the higher velocity ratios. In contrast, the inlet skew has a negligible effect on the distribution of the Sherwood number on the entire pressure surface of the blade. This is mainly because the skew is directed along the passage vortex, which is from the pressure surface of the airfoil to the suction surface of the adjacent airfoil.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Secondary flows in a cascade and velocity boundary near the end wall

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Figure 2

Position of belt upstream of cascade

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Figure 3

Mass transfer blade geometry

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Figure 4

Static pressure distribution on the surface of the blade

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Figure 5

Mass transfer measurement table

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Figure 6

Mesh geometry in gambit

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Figure 7

Experimental distribution of Sh on suction surface

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Figure 8

Experimental comparison of Sh on suction surface at various yb /C (0.019 < yb /C < 0.923)

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Figure 9

Comparison of CFD versus experimental Sh on suction surface

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Figure 10

Experimental distribution of Sh on pressure surface

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Figure 11

Experimental comparison of Sh on pressure surface at various yb /C (0.019 < yb /C < 0.923)

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Figure 12

Comparison of CFD versus experimental Sh on pressure surface

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