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Research Papers

Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Multiple Impingement Jet Arrays for an Active Clearance Control System

[+] Author and Article Information
Riccardo Da Soghe

e-mail: riccardo.dasoghe@htc.de.unifi.it

Lorenzo Tarchi

“S.Stecco” Energy Engineering Department,
University of Florence, 50139, via S. Marta 3,
Florence, Italy

Daniele Coutandin

AVIO S.p.A. - Engineering, R&D 10040,
via Primo Maggio 56, Rivalta di Torino (TO), Italy
e-mail: daniele.coutandin@aviogroup.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received June 27, 2012; final manuscript received August 3, 2012; published online March 25, 2013. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Turbomach 135(3), 031016 (Mar 25, 2013) (9 pages) Paper No: TURBO-12-1080; doi: 10.1115/1.4007481 History: Received June 27, 2012; Revised August 03, 2012

The turbine blade tip clearances control in large aero-engines is currently performed by means of impinging fan air on the outer case flanges. The aim of the present study is to evaluate both the heat transfer coefficient and the adiabatic thermal effectiveness characteristics of an enginelike ACC system, and in particular, to comprehend the effects of the undercowl flow on the impingement jets. The considered geometry replicates the impingement tubes and the by-pass duct used in active control clearance systems. The tube's internal diameter is D = 12 mm, the cooling hole's diameter is d = 1 mm, and the span-wise pitch is Sy/d=12. In order to simulate the undercowl flow, the impingement arrays are inserted inside a tunnel that replicates the typical shape of a real engine by-pass duct. Tests were conducted varying both the mainstream Reynolds number and the jets Reynolds number in a range typical of real-engine operative conditions (Rej=2000-10000, β=1.05-1.15). Numerical calculations are finally proposed to point out if CFD is able to confidently reproduce the experimental evidences.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

ACC system, Ahmed et al. [10]

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Fig. 2

Scheme of a LPT ACC system, Ahmed et al. [11]

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Fig. 4

Tested duct geometries

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Fig. 5

Acquired bitmap during HTC measurements

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Fig. 6

CFD setup (left) numerical domain, (right) numerical grid

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Fig. 7

Streamwise HTC/HTCmax averaged values for β=1.05

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Fig. 8

Streamwise HTC/HTCmax averaged values for β=1.10

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Fig. 9

Streamwise HTC/HTCmax averaged values for β=1.15

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Fig. 10

HTC/HTCmax contours

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Fig. 11

Effectiveness maps

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Fig. 12

Streamwise ηaw averaged values at ReU = 40000

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Fig. 13

Streamwise ηaw averaged values at ReU = 60000

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Fig. 14

Streamwise ηaw averaged values at ReU = 80000

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Fig. 15

Comparison between experiments and CFD: streamwise averaged HTC/HTCmax values at β=1.15

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Fig. 16

Comparison between experiments and CFD: streamwise averaged HTC/HTCmax values at β=1.10

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Fig. 17

Comparison between experiments and CFD: streamwise averaged HTC/HTCmax values at β=1.05

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Fig. 18

Detailed comparison between experiments, CFD, and conjugate analysis: streamwise averaged HTC/HTCmax values at β=1.10, -2.25 > x/Sx > -1.75

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Fig. 19

Comparison between experiments and CFD: streamwise averaged ηaw at β=1.10

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Fig. 20

CFD undercowl flow concentration on the meridional plane, β=1.10

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