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Research Papers

The Influence of Leading Edge Diameter on Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Augmentation Including Effects of Turbulence Level, Scale, and Reynolds Number

[+] Author and Article Information
Preethi Gandavarapu

e-mail: preethi.gandavarapu@my.und.edu

Forrest E. Ames

e-mail: forrest.ames@engr.und.eduMechanical Engineering Department,
University of North Dakota,
243 Centennial Drive, Stop 8359,
Grand Forks, ND 58202-8359

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNALOF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received July 11, 2011; final manuscript received August 10, 2011; published online October 18, 2012. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Turbomach 135(1), 011008 (Oct 18, 2012) (8 pages) Paper No: TURBO-11-1123; doi: 10.1115/1.4006396 History: Received July 11, 2011; Revised August 10, 2011

Stagnation region heat transfer measurements have been acquired on two large cylindrical leading edge test surfaces having a four to one range in leading edge diameter. Heat transfer measurements have been acquired for six turbulence conditions including three grid conditions, two aero-combustor conditions, and a low turbulence condition. The data have been run over an eight to one range in Reynolds numbers for each test surface with Reynolds numbers ranging from 62,500 to 500,000 for the large leading edge and 15,625 to 125,000 for the smaller leading edge. The data show augmentation levels of up to 110% in the stagnation region for the large leading edge. However, the heat transfer results for the large cylindrical leading edge do not appear to infer a significant level of turbulence intensification in the stagnation region. The smaller cylindrical leading edge shows more consistency with earlier stagnation region heat transfer results correlated on the TRL parameter. These results indicate that the intensification of approaching turbulence is more prevalent with the more rapid straining of the smaller leading edge. The downstream regions of both test surfaces continue to accelerate the flow but at a much lower rate than the leading edge. Bypass transition occurs in these regions providing a useful set of data to ground the prediction of transition onset and length over a wide range of Reynolds numbers and turbulence intensity and scales.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of low speed wind tunnel with cylindrical test section

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Fig. 2

Schematic of model aero-combustor turbulence generator

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Fig. 3

Geometries of the 0.1016 m and 0.4064 m diameter cylinders

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Fig. 4

Calculated surface velocity distributions over 0.1016 m and 0.4064 m diameter leading edge cylinders

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Fig. 5

Comparison of experimental Nusselt number distributions for low turbulence condition with STAN7 predictions for smaller (0.1016 m) cylinder and afterbody

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Fig. 6

Comparison of experimental Nusselt number distributions for low turbulence condition with STAN7 predictions for larger (0.4064 m) cylinder and afterbody

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Fig. 7

Correlation of the fractional increase in heat transfer versus the TRL parameter

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Fig. 8

Nusselt number versus TRL parameter for smaller (0.1016 m) and larger (0.4064 m) cylindrical leading edge test surfaces

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Fig. 9

Nusselt number distribution on 0.1016 m diameter leading edge test surface for ReD = 62,500 based on approach velocity comparing the influence of turbulence

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Fig. 10

Nusselt number distribution on 0.1016 m diameter leading edge test surface, ReD = 125,000 based on approach velocity comparing the influence of turbulence

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Fig. 11

Nusselt number distribution on 0.4064 m diameter leading edge test surface, ReD = 250,000 based on approach velocity comparing the influence of turbulence

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Fig. 12

Nusselt number distribution on 0.4064 m diameter leading edge test surface, ReD = 500,000 based on approach velocity comparing the influence of turbulence

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