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Research Papers

Stability Improvement of High-Pressure-Ratio Turbocharger Centrifugal Compressor by Asymmetric Flow Control—Part I: Non-Axisymmetrical Flow in Centrifugal Compressor

[+] Author and Article Information
Xinqian Zheng

e-mail: zhengxq@tsinghua.edu.cn

Yangjun Zhang

State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China

Hideaki Tamaki

Turbo Machinery and Engine Technology Department,
IHI Corporation,
Yokohama, 235-8501, Japan

Joern Huenteler

RWTH Aachen University,
Aachen 52056, Germany

Zhigang Li

Beijing Special Vehicle Institute,
Beijing 100072, China

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received April 26, 2010; final manuscript received December 26, 2011; published online November 1, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Michael Casey.

J. Turbomach 135(2), 021006 (Nov 01, 2012) (9 pages) Paper No: TURBO-10-1038; doi: 10.1115/1.4006636 History: Received April 26, 2010; Revised December 26, 2011

This is Part I of a two-part paper documenting the development of a novel asymmetric flow control method to improve the stability of a high-pressure-ratio turbocharger centrifugal compressor. Part I focuses on the nonaxisymmetrical flow in a centrifugal compressor induced by the nonaxisymmetrical geometry of the volute while Part II describes the development of an asymmetric flow control method to avoid the stall on the basis of the characteristic of nonaxisymmetrical flow. To understand the asymmetries, experimental measurements and corresponding numerical simulation were carried out. The static pressure was measured by probes at different circumferential and stream-wise positions to gain insights about the asymmetries. The experimental results show that there is an evident nonaxisymmetrical flow pattern throughout the compressor due to the asymmetric geometry of the overhung volute. The static pressure field in the diffuser is distorted at approximately 90 deg in the rotational direction of the volute tongue throughout the diffuser. The magnitude of this distortion slightly varies with the rotational speed. The magnitude of the static pressure distortion in the impeller is a function of the rotational speed. There is a significant phase shift between the static pressure distributions at the leading edge of the splitter blades and the impeller outlet. The numerical steady state simulation neglects the aforementioned unsteady effects found in the experiments and cannot predict the phase shift, however, a detailed asymmetric flow field structure is obviously obtained.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Measurement positions in the investigated compressor: (a) measurement in the impeller, (b) measurement in the diffuser, and (c) measurement in the volute

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Fig. 2

Created mesh in detail: (a) passage mesh projected on solid walls, (b) butterfly meshing approach in volute cross-section, and (c) volute mesh and passage numbering

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Fig. 3

Influence of the relative position of the impeller and volute on performance: (a) compressor performance, (b) pressure coefficient at the diffuser outlet, and (c) pressure coefficient at the impeller outlet

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Fig. 4

Measured compressor performance

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Fig. 5

Static pressure distribution in the volute at 100% N

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Fig. 6

Pressure coefficient distribution in the diffuser near surge

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Fig. 7

Pressure coefficient distribution in the diffuser near choke

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Fig. 8

Magnitude of the pressure coefficient distortion in the diffuser near surge

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Fig. 9

Pressure coefficient distribution at the leading edge of the splitter blades near surge

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Fig. 10

Pressure coefficient distribution at the leading edge of the main blades near surge

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Fig. 11

Pressure coefficient distribution at the leading edge of the splitter blades near choke

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Fig. 12

Pressure coefficient distribution at the leading edge of the main blades near choke

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Fig. 13

Magnitude of the pressure coefficient distortion at the leading edge of the splitter blades near surge

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Fig. 14

Static pressure distribution at the diffuser inlet and the leading edge of the splitter blades near surge at 105% N

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Fig. 15

Comparison of the performance of the experiment and numerical simulation at 100% N: (a) total to total pressure ratio, and (b) total to total efficiency

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Fig. 16

Pressure coefficient distributions comparison in the diffuser near surge at 100% N

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Fig. 17

Pressure coefficient distribution in the circumferential direction near the leading edge of the splitter blades near surge at 100% N

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Fig. 18

Flow parameters distribution in the impeller passages near surge at 100% N

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Fig. 19

Static pressure distribution near the tip of the impeller blades near surge at 100% N

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Fig. 20

Relative Mach number distribution near the tip of the impeller blades near surge at 100% N: (a) passages 8, 9, 1, and 2, and (b) passages 3, 4, 5, and 6

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