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Research Papers

An Impact of Various Shroud Bleed Slot Configurations and Cavity Vanes on Compressor Map Width and the Inducer Flow Field

[+] Author and Article Information
Subenuka Sivagnanasundaram

e-mail: Ssivagnanasundaram01@qub.ac.uk

Stephen Spence

e-mail: s.w.spence@qub.ac.uk

Juliana Early

School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering,
Queen's University,
University Road,
Belfast BT7 1NN, UK

Bahram Nikpour

Cummins Turbo Technologies,
Huddersfield, UK

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute of ASME for publication in the Journal of Turbomachinery. Manuscript received September 20, 2011; final manuscript received November 26, 2011; published online June 3, 2013. Assoc. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Turbomach 135(4), 041003 (Jun 03, 2013) (10 pages) Paper No: TURBO-11-1212; doi: 10.1115/1.4007513 History: Received September 20, 2011; Revised November 26, 2011

This paper describes an investigation of map width enhancement and a detailed analysis of the inducer flow field due to various bleed slot configurations and vanes in the annular cavity of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor. The compressor under investigation is used in a turbocharger application for a heavy duty diesel engine of approximately 400 hp. This investigation has been undertaken using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the full compressor stage, which includes a manual multiblock-structured grid generation method. The influence of the bleed slot flow on the inducer flow field at a range of operating conditions has been analyzed, highlighting the improvement in surge and choked flow capability. The impact of the bleed slot geometry variations and the inclusion of cavity vanes on the inlet incidence angle have been studied in detail by considering the swirl component introduced at the leading edge by the recirculating flow through the slot. Further, the overall stage efficiency and the nonuniform flow field at the inducer inlet have been also analyzed. The analysis revealed that increasing the slot width has increased the map width by about 17%. However, it has a small impact on the efficiency, due to the frictional and mixing losses. Moreover, adding vanes in the cavity improved the pressure ratio and compressor performance noticeably. A detail analysis of the compressor with cavity vanes has also been presented.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Effect of swirl component on incidence at inducer inlet

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Fig. 2

Schematic of full-stage compressor flow passage

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Fig. 3

(a) Pressure ratio and (b) efficiency prediction of baseline compressor

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Fig. 4

Schematic of slot width modification

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Fig. 5

(a) Pressure ratio and (b) efficiency prediction of baseline compressor with various slot width

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Fig. 6

Map width of the compressor due to different slot widths

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Fig. 7

Slot flow variation against (a) inducer flow and (b) stage flow due to different slot widths

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Fig. 8

Impact of various slot widths on inducer and slot flow capability at choke and surge

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Fig. 9

Representation of the flow mixing in the circumferential and spanwise directions at the inducer inlet

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Fig. 10

Computational model of the impeller with the vanes in the cavity

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Fig. 11

Schematic of the model shows the vane location

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Fig. 12

(a) Pressure ratio and (b) efficiency prediction of the compressor with vanes in the cavity (at 87% and 100% speed)

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Fig. 13

Slot flow variation against (a) inducer flow and (b) stage flow rates with and without cavity vanes

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Fig. 14

Velocity contour in the slot passage (at 87% speed)

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Fig. 15

Incidence angle variations at just upstream of the main blade leading edge during choke flow

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Fig. 16

Mass circumferentially averaged (MCA) axial velocity variation at just upstream of the main blade leading edge during choke flow

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Fig. 17

Incidence angle variations at just upstream of the main blade leading edge during choke flow

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Fig. 18

Incidence angle variations at just upstream of the main blade leading edge during surge flow

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Fig. 19

MCA swirl velocity component at just upstream of the main blade leading edge during surge flow

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Fig. 20

Incidence angle variations at just upstream of the main blade leading edge during surge flow with and without cavity vanes

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Fig. 21

MCA swirl velocity component variations at just upstream of the main blade leading edge during surge flow

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Fig. 22

MCA axial velocity variations at just upstream of the main blade leading edge during surge flow

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Fig. 23

(a), (b), and (c) represent the absolute circumferential velocity variation at the inducer inlet with and without cavity vanes at 87% speed

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Fig. 24

Pressure ratio characteristics of the compressor due to 3 different relative locations between the impeller blade and the cavity vane

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Fig. 25

Efficiency of the compressor due to 3 different relative locations between the impeller blade and the cavity vane

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Fig. 26

Slot flow variation due to 3 different relative locations between the impeller blade and the cavity vane

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