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Research Papers

Impact of the Combustor-Turbine Interface Slot Orientation on the Durability of a Nozzle Guide Vane Endwall

[+] Author and Article Information
Alan Thrift

e-mail: alan.thrift@siemens.com

Karen Thole

e-mail: kthole@psu.edu
Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department,
Pennsylvania State University,
State College, PA 16803

Satoshi Hada

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries LTD,
Takasago Machinery Works,
Hyogo, 676-8686 Japan
e-mail: satoshi_hada@mhi.co.jp

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received July 16, 2012; final manuscript received August 8, 2012; published online June 5, 2013. Assoc. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Turbomach 135(4), 041019 (Jun 05, 2013) (10 pages) Paper No: TURBO-12-1148; doi: 10.1115/1.4007602 History: Received July 16, 2012; Revised August 08, 2012

The combustor-turbine interface is an essential component in a gas turbine engine as it allows for thermal expansion between the first stage turbine vanes and combustor section. Although not considered as part of the external cooling scheme, leakage flow from the combustor-turbine interface can be utilized as coolant. This paper reports on the effects of orientation of a two-dimensional leakage slot, simulating the combustor-turbine interface, on the net heat flux reduction to a nozzle guide vane endwall. In addition to adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer measurements, time-resolved, digital particle image velocimetry (TRDPIV) measurements were performed in the vane stagnation plane. Four interface slot orientations of 90 deg, 65 deg, 45 deg, and 30 deg located at 17% axial chord upstream of a first vane in a linear cascade were studied. Results indicate that reducing the slot angle to 45 deg can provide as much as a 137% reduction to the average heat load experienced by the endwall. Velocity measurements indicate the formation of a large leading edge vortex for coolant injected at 90 deg and 65 deg while coolant injected at 45 deg and 30 deg flows along the endwall and washes up the vane surface at the endwall junction.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Depiction of the low speed, closed loop wind tunnel

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the linear vane cascade with the different leakage slot orientations and the TRDPIV setup

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Fig. 3

Comparison of adiabatic effectiveness contours between four different slot orientations for MFR = 1.0% and I = 2.8

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Fig. 4

Comparison of Nusselt number contours between four different slot orientations for MFR = 1.0% and I = 2.8

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Fig. 5

Average flowfield vectors, streamlines, and contours of turbulence intensity in the stagnation plane with MFR = 1.0% and I = 2.8 for the (a) 90 deg, (b) 65 deg, (c) 45 deg, and (d) 30 deg slot orientations

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Fig. 6

Comparison of net heat flux reduction contours between four different slot orientations for MFR = 1.0% and I = 2.8

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Fig. 7

Area averaged net heat flux reduction between four different slot orientations

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Fig. 8

Comparison of adiabatic effectiveness contours between four different slot orientations for MFR = 0.5% and I = 0.7

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Fig. 9

Comparison of Nusselt number contours between three different slot orientations for MFR = 0.5% and I = 0.7

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Fig. 10

Average flowfield vectors, streamlines, and contours of turbulence intensity in the stagnation plane with MFR = 0.5% and I = 0.7 for the (a) 90 deg, (b) 65 deg, (c) 45 deg, and (d) 30 deg slot orientations

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Fig. 11

Comparison of net heat flux reduction contours between four different slot orientations for MFR = 0.5% and I = 0.7

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