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Research Papers

Multicolor Techniques for Identification and Filtering of Burst Signals in Jet Engine Pyrometers

[+] Author and Article Information
Jordi Estevadeordal

e-mail: estevade@ge.com

Guanghua Wang

GE Global Research Center,
One Research Circle,
Niskayuna, NY 12309

Joseph D. Rigney

GE Aviation,
1 Neumann Way,
Cincinnati, OH 45215

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received January 10, 2013; final manuscript received February 17, 2013; published online September 26, 2013. Editor: David Wisler.

J. Turbomach 136(3), 031004 (Sep 26, 2013) (9 pages) Paper No: TURBO-13-1004; doi: 10.1115/1.4024678 History: Received January 10, 2013; Revised February 17, 2013

A Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)-funded multicolor pyrometry (MCP) experiment was carried out on a government-provided aircraft engine to study the nature of hot particulate bursts generated from the combustor at certain engine conditions. These bursts of hot particulates lead to intermittent high-voltage signal output from the line-of-sight (LOS) pyrometer that is ultimately detected and used by the onboard digital engine controller (DEC). The investigation used a high-speed MCP system designed to detect bursts and identify their properties. Results of the radiant temperature, multicolor temperature, and apparent emissivity are presented. The results indicated that the apparent emissivity calculated during the signal burst was lower than that of the blade. The root cause for the signal burst was identified as soot particles generated as a by-product of combustion under certain conditions. This conclusion was drawn based on both experimental and simulation results. Technical strategies to separate, reduce, or remove the burst signal are proposed.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Example of pyrometer system optical access [2]

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Fig. 2

Absorption negligible detection windows (1–5) for combustion products H2O and CO2 at gas turbine running conditions [3]

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Fig. 3

Hardware-tree schematic of the MCP system

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Fig. 4

Normal case time window (gray: 1064 nm, green: 1600 nm, blue: 2200 nm)

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Fig. 5

Normal case time window with a burst (gray: 1064 nm, green: 1600 nm, blue: 2200 nm)

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Fig. 6

Burst case samples (gray: 1064 nm, green: 1600 nm, blue: 2200 nm)

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Fig. 7

Burst case samples (gray: 1064 nm, green: 1600 nm, blue: 2200 nm)

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Fig. 8

Detail of the burst case in a time window (gray: 1064 nm, green: 1600 nm, blue: 2200 nm)

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Fig. 9

Burst case in a time window (gray: 1064 nm, green: 1600 nm, blue: 2200 nm)

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Fig. 10

Soot/blade typical radiation-spectra ratio

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Fig. 11

Effective emissivity calculation for soot particles at various volume fractions and optical path lengths

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Fig. 12

Comparison of the black body radiation signals at two representative temperatures with the soot radiation with different effective emissivities (red: combustion, purple: blade, others: soot at various ppm-cm in text)

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Fig. 13

Zoomed view of Fig. 12

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