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Research Papers

Surge Onset in Turbo Heat Pumps

[+] Author and Article Information
Jieun Song

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
Department, Seoul National University,
Seoul 151-742, Korea
e-mail: jehouse5@snu.ac.kr

Jung Chan Park

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
Department, Seoul National University,
Seoul 151-742, Korea
e-mail: jungchan.park@hdec.co.kr

Kil Young Kim

Air Conditioning and Energy Solution R&D Lab, LG Electronics Inc.,
Seoul 153-802, Korea
e-mail: gkil0kim@gmail.com

Jinhee Jeong

Air Conditioning and Energy Solution R&D Lab, LG Electronics Inc.,
Seoul 153-802, Korea
e-mail: jinhee.jeong@lge.com

Seung Jin Song

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
Department, Seoul National University,
Seoul 151-742, Korea
e-mail: sjsong@snu.ac.kr

The rate of heat transfer needed to produce 1 ton of ice at 32°F (0 °C) from water at 32°F in 24 h; 1 RT = 12,000 Btu/h = 3.024 kcal/h [11].

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received October 28, 2013; final manuscript received November 18, 2013; published online January 2, 2014. Editor: Ronald Bunker.

J. Turbomach 136(8), 081001 (Jan 02, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: TURBO-13-1247; doi: 10.1115/1.4026145 History: Received October 28, 2013; Revised November 18, 2013

A typical turbo heat pump system consists of a centrifugal compressor, expansion valve, and two heat exchangers—a condenser and evaporator. Compared to a gas turbine, a turbo heat pump introduces additional complexities because it is a two-phase closed-loop system with heat exchange using a real gas/liquid (refrigerant) as the working fluid. For the first time, surge onset in such systems has been physically, analytically, and experimentally investigated. This study analytically investigates the physical mechanisms of surge onset in turbo heat pumps. From an existing nonlinear turbo heat pump surge model, the turbo heat pump is viewed as a mass-spring-damper system with two inertias, two dampers, and four springs which is then further simplified to a single degree-of-freedom system. Surge onset occurs when the system damping becomes zero and depends not only the compressor but also on the ducts, heat exchangers, and expansion valve. Alternatively, a new stability model has been developed by applying a linearized small perturbation method to the nonlinear turbo heat pump surge model. When the new linear stability model is applied to a conventional open loop compression system (e.g., a turbocharger), predictions identical to those of Greitzer's model are obtained. In addition, surge onset has been experimentally measured in two turbo heat pumps. A comparison of the predictions and measurements shows that the mass-spring-damper model and the linearized stability model can accurately predict the turbo heat pump surge onset and the mass-spring-damper model can explain the turbo heat pump surge onset mechanisms and parametric trends in turbo heat pumps.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

Simplified mass-spring-damper systems

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Fig. 2

Mass-spring-damper systems of turbo heat pump systems

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Fig. 6

Turbo heat pump test-rig (LG Electronics)

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Fig. 7

Sensor locations: , pressure; , temperature; and , flow rate

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Fig. 8

Measured compressor characteristic of the turbo heat pump (compressor A)

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Fig. 10

Measured compressor characteristic of the turbo heat pump (compressor B)

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Fig. 11

Predicted root locus plot (compressor B)

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Fig. 1

Turbo heat pump: (a) schematic of a turbo heat pump, and (b) P-h diagram

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Fig. 12

Predicted surge onset points on the compressor curve with varying ω2/ω1 parameter

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Fig. 14

Predicted surge onset points on the compressor curve with varying B parameter

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Fig. 4

Compressor characteristic curve of Pinsley

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Fig. 5

Root locus plots for B = 1.0: (a) Greitzer's model, and (b) turbo heat pump stability model

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Fig. 9

Predicted root locus plot (compressor A)

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Fig. 13

Predicted surge onset points on the compressor curve with varying G parameter

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