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Research Papers

Comparison of the Aerodynamics of Acoustically Designed Exit Guide Vanes and a State-of-the-Art Exit Guide Vane

[+] Author and Article Information
Andreas Marn

Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery
and Machine Dynamics,
Graz University of Technology,
Inffeldgasse 25/A,
Graz 8010, Austria
e-mail: andreas.marn@tugraz.at

Dominik Broszat

MTU Aero Engines AG,
Dachauerstraße 665,
Munich 80995, Germany

Thorsten Selic

Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery
and Machine Dynamics,
Graz University of Technology,
Inffeldgasse 25/A,
Graz 8010, Austria

Florian Schönleitner, Franz Heitmeir

Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery
and Machine Dynamics,
Graz University of Technology,
Inffeldgasse 25/A,
Graz 8010, Austria

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received July 12, 2014; final manuscript received July 23, 2014; published online October 28, 2014. Editor: Ronald Bunker.

J. Turbomach 137(4), 041002 (Oct 28, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: TURBO-14-1135; doi: 10.1115/1.4028457 History: Received July 12, 2014; Revised July 23, 2014

Within previous EU projects, possible modifications to the engine architecture have been investigated, which would allow for an optimized aerodynamic or acoustic design of the exit guide vanes (EGVs) of the turbine exit casing (TEC). However, the engine weight should not be increased and the aerodynamic performance must be at least the same. This paper compares a state-of-the art TEC (reference TEC) with typical EGVs with an acoustically optimized TEC configuration for the engine operating point approach. It is shown that a reduction in sound power level for the fundamental tone (one blade passing frequency (BPF)) for this acoustically important operating point can be achieved. It is also shown that the weight of the acoustically optimized EGVs (only bladings considered) is almost equal to the reference TEC, but a reduction in engine length can be achieved. Measurements were conducted in the subsonic test turbine facility (STTF) at the Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery and Machine Dynamics, Graz University of Technology. The inlet guide vanes (IGVs), the low pressure turbine (LPT) stage, and the EGVs have been designed by MTU Aero Engines.

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References

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Hjärne, J., 2007, “Turbine Outlet Guide Vane Flows,” Ph.D. thesis, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
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Moser, M., Tapken, U., Enghardt, L., and Neuhaus, L., 2009, “An Investigation of Low Pressure Turbine Blade-Vane Interaction Noise: Measurements in a 1.5-Stage Rig,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., A., 223(6), pp. 687–695. [CrossRef]
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Enghardt, L., Tapken, U., Neise, W., Kennepohl, F., and Heinig, K., 2001, “Turbine Blade/Vane Interaction Noise: Acoustic Mode Analysis Using In-Duct Sensor Arrays,” AIAA Paper No. AIAA-2001-2153.
Enghardt, L., Tapken, U., Koronow, and Kennepohl, F., 2005, “Acoustic Mode Decomposition of Compressor Noise Under Consideration of Radial Flow Profiles,” AIAA Paper No. 2005-2833. [CrossRef]
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Sieverding, C. H., 1985, “Recent Progress in the Understanding of Basic Aspects of Secondary Flows in Turbine Blade Passages,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 107(2), pp. 248–257. [CrossRef]
Marn, A., Göttlich, E., Cadrecha, D., and Pirker, H. P., 2009, “Shorten the Intermediate Turbine Duct Length by Applying an Integrated Concept,” ASME J. Turbomach., 131(4), p. 041014. [CrossRef]

Figures

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Fig. 1

Meridional section of the STTF; (a) reference TEC and (b) inverse cut-off TEC

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Fig. 2

Sound power level (1 BPF) of the reference TEC (dark: SPL+ and bright: SPL-)

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Fig. 3

Sound power level (1 BPF) of inverse cut-off TEC (dark: SPL+ and bright: SPL-)

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Fig. 4

Sound power level (1 BPF) of the main interaction modes (left: reference TEC and right: inverse cut-off TEC)

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Fig. 5

Mach number distribution at TEC inlet

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Fig. 6

Yaw angle distribution at TEC inlet

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Fig. 7

Mach number distribution at the inlet to the EGV for the reference TEC measured at plane C

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Fig. 8

Yaw angle distribution at the inlet to the EGV for the reference TEC measured at plane C

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Fig. 9

Mach number distribution at the outlet of the EGV for the reference TEC measured at plane D

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Fig. 10

Mach distribution at the outlet of the EGV for the inverse cut-off TEC measured at plane D

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Fig. 11

Mach number distribution at the outlet of the EGV for the inverse cut-off TEC measured at plane D0 (closer to the vane TE)

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Fig. 12

Yaw angle distribution at the outlet of the EGV for the reference TEC measured at plane D

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Fig. 13

Yaw angle distribution at the outlet of the EGV for the inverse cut-off TEC measured at plane D

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Fig. 14

Yaw angle distribution at the outlet of the EGV for the inverse cut-off TEC measured at plane D0 (closer to the vane TE)

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Fig. 15

Suction side reference TEC

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Fig. 16

Mach number distribution TEC exit

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Fig. 17

Yaw angle distribution TEC exit

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Fig. 18

Pressure side reference TEC

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Fig. 19

Pressure side inverse cut-off TEC

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Fig. 20

Hub endwall reference TEC

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Fig. 21

Suction side inverse cut-off TEC

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Fig. 22

Casing end wall reference TEC

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Fig. 23

Hub endwall inverse cut-off TEC

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Fig. 24

Casing endwall inverse cut-off TEC

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Fig. 25

Distribution of pressure coefficient at 30% span

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Fig. 26

Weight of the EGVs

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