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Research Papers

Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Distribution of a Rotating Ribbed Channel at Different Reynolds Numbers

[+] Author and Article Information
Ignacio Mayo

Turbomachinery and Propulsion Department,
von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics,
Chausée de Waterloo 72,
Rhode-Saint-Genèse 1640, Belgium
e-mail: ignacio.mayo.yague@vki.ac.be

Tony Arts

Turbomachinery and Propulsion Department,
von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics,
Chausée de Waterloo 72,
Rhode-Saint-Genèse 1640, Belgium
e-mail: arts@vki.ac.be

Ahmed El-Habib

Turbomachinery and Propulsion Department,
von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics,
Chausée de Waterloo 72,
Rhode-Saint-Genèse 1640, Belgium
e-mail: el.habib.ahmed@gmail.com

Benjamin Parres

Turbomachinery and Propulsion Department,
von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics,
Chausée de Waterloo 72,
Rhode-Saint-Genèse 1640, Belgium
e-mail: benjamin.parres@gmail.com

1Present address: Cockerill Maintenance & Ingénierie, Seraing 4100, Belgium.

2Present address: Toyota Motor Europe, Brussels 1040, Belgium.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received July 22, 2014; final manuscript received July 28, 2014; published online September 30, 2014. Editor: Ronald Bunker.

J. Turbomach 137(3), 031002 (Sep 30, 2014) (11 pages) Paper No: TURBO-14-1164; doi: 10.1115/1.4028458 History: Received July 22, 2014; Revised July 28, 2014

The convective heat transfer distribution in a rib-roughened rotating internal cooling channel was measured for different rotation and Reynolds numbers, representative of engine operating conditions. The test section consisted of a channel of aspect ratio equal to 0.9 with one wall equipped with eight ribs perpendicular to the main flow direction. The pitch to rib height ratio was 10 and the rib blockage was 10%. The test rig was designed to provide a uniform heat flux boundary condition over the ribbed wall, minimizing the heat transfer losses and allowing temperature measurements at significant rotation rates. Steady-state liquid crystal thermography (LCT) was employed to quantify a detailed 2D distribution of the wall temperature, allowing the determination of the convective heat transfer coefficient along the area between the sixth and eighth rib. The channel and all the required instrumentation were mounted on a large rotating disk, providing the same spatial resolution and measurement accuracy as in a stationary rig. The assembly was able to rotate both in clockwise and counterclockwise directions, so that the investigated wall was acting either as leading or trailing side, respectively. The tested Reynolds number values (based on the hydraulic diameter of the channel) were 15,000, 20,000, 30,000, and 40,000. The maximum rotation number values were ranging between 0.12 (Re = 40,000) and 0.30 (Re = 15,000). Turbulence profiles and secondary flows modified by rotation have shown their impact not only on the average value of the heat transfer coefficient but also on its distribution. On the trailing side, the heat transfer distribution flattens as the rotation number increases, while its averaged value increases due to the turbulence enhancement and secondary flows induced by the rotation. On the leading side, the secondary flows counteract the turbulence reduction and the overall heat transfer coefficient exhibits a limited decrease. In the latter case, the secondary flows are responsible for high heat transfer gradients on the investigated area.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Sketch of the secondary flows in a rotating ribbed channel without the effect of buoyancy (adapted from Ref. [5])

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Fig. 2

Layout of the experimental facility

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Fig. 3

Channel model sketch

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Fig. 8

Averaged EF as a function of Re and Ro on the area between the sixth and seventh rib

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Fig. 9

Averaged EF as a function of Re and Ro on the area between the seventh and eighth rib

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Fig. 7

(a) EF distribution between the sixth and seventh ribs at different Re and Ro. (b) EF distribution between the sixth and seventh ribs at different Re and Ro.

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Fig. 6

Combination of the PIV data of Ref. [5] with the present measurements

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Fig. 5

Comparison between the present investigation and the data of Rau et al. [22] in static conditions for Re = 30,000

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Fig. 4

EF distribution for Re = 30,000 and Ro = 0.0

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Fig. 10

Averaged EF as a function of Ro and Re on the area between the sixth and seventh rib

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Fig. 11

Averaged EF as a function of Ro and Re on the area between the seventh and eighth rib

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Fig. 12

Variation of the EF on the area between the sixth and seventh rib

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Fig. 13

Ratio of the Nuc in rotation to the Nuc,s in static conditions in different studies

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