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Research Papers

Experimental Investigation Into the Effects of the Steady Wake-Tip Clearance Vortex Interaction in a Compressor Cascade

[+] Author and Article Information
Andreas Krug

Institute of Fluid Mechanics,
Technische Universität Dresden,
Dresden 01062, Germany
e-mail: andreas.krug@tu-dresden.de

Peter Busse, Konrad Vogeler

Institute of Fluid Mechanics,
Technische Universität Dresden,
Dresden 01062, Germany

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received September 15, 2014; final manuscript received September 29, 2014; published online December 11, 2014. Editor: Ronald Bunker.

J. Turbomach 137(6), 061006 (Jun 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: TURBO-14-1244; doi: 10.1115/1.4028797 History: Received September 15, 2014; Revised September 29, 2014; Online December 11, 2014

An important aspect of the aerodynamic flow field in the tip region of axial compressor rotors is the unsteady interaction between the tip clearance vortex (TCV) and the incoming stator wakes. In order to gain an improved understanding of the mechanics involved, systematic studies need to be performed. As a first step toward the characterization of the dynamic effects caused by the relative movement of the blade rows, the impact of a stationary wake-induced inlet disturbance on a linear compressor cascade with tip clearance will be analyzed. The wakes were generated by a fixed grid of cylindrical bars with variable pitch being placed at discrete pitchwise positions. This paper focuses on experimental studies conducted at the newly designed low-speed cascade wind tunnel in Dresden. The general tunnel configuration and details on the specific cascade setup will be presented. Steady state flow field measurements were carried out using five-hole probe traverses up- and downstream of the cascade and accompanied by static wall pressure readings. 2D-particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements complemented these results by visualizing the blade-to-blade flow field. Hence, the structure of the evolving secondary flow system is evaluated and compared for all tested configurations.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Cross-sectional view of the wind tunnel setup

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Fig. 2

(a) Schematic diagram of the test section and (b) cascade parameters and definitions

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Fig. 3

Midspan profile characteristic (operating point highlighted with gray marker line)

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Fig. 4

Secondary flow vectors plotted over total pressure loss coefficient

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Fig. 5

Velocity vectors cxy = c1,MS plotted over normalized wall pressure distribution cpw

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Fig. 6

Pitchwise averaged flow parameters

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Fig. 7

Globally averaged flow parameters

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Fig. 8

Inlet boundary layer with bar cascade (secondary vectors plotted over total pressure loss coefficient)

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Fig. 9

Wake-induced disturbance of aerodynamic profile properties at midspan

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Fig. 10

Scheme of investigated bar positions for tbar/t = 0.76

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Fig. 11

Globally averaged, normalized variation of secondary loss

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Fig. 12

Influence of static bar wakes on the secondary flow field for tbar/t = 0.76

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Fig. 13

Variation of spanwise velocity for tbar/t = 0.76 and y/tbar = −0.33

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Fig. 14

Mean secondary loss variation for tbar/t = 0.76

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Fig. 15

Influence of bar pitch ratio on the secondary flow field for s/C = 0.03 and y/tbar = 0

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Fig. 16

Influence of bar pitch ratio on the static wall pressure distribution for s/C = 0.03 and y/tbar = 0

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