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Research Papers

Geometric Mistuning Reduced-Order Models for Integrally Bladed Rotors With Mistuned Disk–Blade Boundaries

[+] Author and Article Information
Joseph A. Beck

Manufacturing and Industrial
Technologies Division,
Air Force Research Laboratory,
Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433
e-mail: Joseph.Beck.8@us.af.mil

Jeffrey M. Brown, Alex A. Kaszynski, Charles J. Cross

Turbine Engine Division,
Air Force Research Laboratory,
Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433

Joseph C. Slater

Associate Dean
Defense Aerospace Studies,
Wright State University,
Dayton, OH 45435

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received April 4, 2013; final manuscript received June 11, 2014; published online December 23, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Rakesh Srivastava.

This material is declared a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

J. Turbomach 137(7), 071001 (Jul 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: TURBO-13-1053; doi: 10.1115/1.4029122 History: Received April 04, 2013; Revised June 11, 2014; Online December 23, 2014

New geometric mistuning modeling approaches for integrally bladed rotors (IBRs) are developed for incorporating geometric perturbations to a fundamental disk–blade sector, particularly the disk–blade boundary or connection. Reduced-order models (ROMs) are developed from a Craig–Bampton component mode synthesis (C–B CMS) framework that is further reduced by a truncated set of interface modes that are obtained from an Eigen-analysis of the C–B CMS constraint degrees of freedom (DOFs). An investigation into using a set of tuned interface modes and tuned constraint modes for model reduction is then performed, which offers significant computational savings for subsequent analyses. Two configurations of disk–blade connection mistuning are investigated: as-measured principal component (PC) deviations and random perturbations to the interblade spacing. Furthermore, the perturbation sizes are amplified to investigate the significance of incorporating mistuned disk–blade connections during solid model generation from optically scanned geometries. Free and forced response results are obtained for each ROM and each disk–blade connection type and compared to full finite element model (FEM) solutions. It is shown that the developed methods provide accurate results with a reduction in solution time compared to the full FEM. In addition, results indicate that the inclusion of a mistuned disk–blade connection deviations are small or conditions where large perturbations are localized to a small areas of the disk–blade connection.

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Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Topics: Disks , Blades
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Index notation for the IBR partitionment of a single sector

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Fig. 2

Full ADLARF IBR test case

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Fig. 3

ADLARF blade (pressure side) x-direction surface deviations

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Fig. 4

Histogram of the magnitudes of Euclidean distance geometric points between tuned and mistuned for all 16 blades, excluding the points defining the disk–blade connection. Dimensions are in inches.

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Fig. 5

Full nodal diameter plot (a) illustrating natural frequencies versus nodal diameters. The investigated frequency ranges (zoomed in (b)) at the specific E.O. excitations is circled.

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Fig. 6

Histogram of the magnitudes of Euclidean distance geometric points between a tuned disk–blade connection and mistuned configuration A1. Dimensions are in inches.

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Fig. 7

Superposition of all 16 disk–blade connections for mistuned A3 configuration that illustrate upper and lower surface deviations

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Fig. 8

Histogram of the magnitudes of Euclidean distance geometric points between a tuned disk–blade connection and mistuned configuration A4. Dimensions are in inches.

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Fig. 9

Superposition of all 16 disk–blade connections for configuration A4 that illustrate interblade spacing deviations

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Fig. 10

Worst-case magnitude of nodal displacement deviations between a tuned and mistuned constraint mode: (a) configuration A1 and (b) configuration A3

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Fig. 11

IBR natural frequency error for each ROM compared against full FEM predictions for configurations A1, A3, and A4: (a) configuration A1, (b) configuration A3, and (c) configuration A4

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Fig. 12

Peak blade-to-blade response predictions for each ROM compared against full FEM predictions for configurations A1 and A4: (a) configuration A1 and (b) configuration A4

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Fig. 13

Peak blade-to-blade response error for each ROM compared against full FEM predictions for configurations A1, A3, and A4: (a) configuration A1, (b) configuration A3, and (c) configuration A4

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Fig. 14

MIMCM peak blade-to-blade response error compared against those assuming a tuned disk–blade connection: (a) configurations A1–A3 and (b) configuration A4

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