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Research Papers

Further Investigation on Transonic Compressor Stall Margin Enhancement With Stall Precursor-Suppressed Casing Treatment

[+] Author and Article Information
Dakun Sun

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Co-Innovation Center for Advanced Aero-Engine,
Beihang University,
No. 37 Xueyuan Road,
Haidian District,
Beijing 100191, China
e-mail: sundk@buaa.edu.cn

Chaoqun Nie

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
No. 11 Beisihuanxi Road,
Haidian District,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: ncq@iet.cn

Xiaohua Liu

Engine Certification Center,
Civil Aviation Administration of China,
No. 3 Huajiadi East Road,
Chaoyang District,
Beijing 100102, China
e-mail: Liuxh@buaa.edu.cn

Feng Lin

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
No. 11 Beisihuanxi Road,
Haidian District,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: linfeng@iet.cn

Xiaofeng Sun

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Co-Innovation Center for Advanced Aero-Engine,
Beihang University,
No. 37 Xueyuan Road,
Haidian District,
Beijing 100191, China
e-mail: sunxf@buaa.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received November 18, 2014; final manuscript received October 7, 2015; published online October 27, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Steven E. Gorrell.

J. Turbomach 138(2), 021001 (Oct 27, 2015) (13 pages) Paper No: TURBO-14-1299; doi: 10.1115/1.4031775 History: Received November 18, 2014; Revised October 07, 2015

A kind of casing treatment, named as stall precursor-suppressed (SPS), has been developed recently, which was proved to be able to effectively improve stall margin (SM) without significant efficiency loss in low-speed axial flow compressors and a transonic compressor rotor. In this paper, the effectiveness of the SPS casing treatment is investigated in a single-stage transonic compressor. Based on an extended stall inception model, the quantitative evaluation of the SM enhancement by the SPS casing treatment is presented for the transonic compressor stage. The model predicts that a 2.5–6.8% of stall margin improvement (SMI), which is defined in terms of mass flow rate at stall inception, can be achieved at the design rotational speed. The experimental results show that the SPS casing treatment can achieve 3.5–9.3% of the SMI at 95% design rotational speed. Due to the fact that the distributions of the total pressure ratio along the spanwise direction are kept the same as those of the solid wall casing at the same mass flow rate, the SPS casing treatments with a small open area ratio and large backchamber enhance the SM without a recognizable efficiency loss and a migration of the pressure-rise characteristics. Furthermore, the mechanism of SMI with the SPS casing treatment is investigated in the experiments. In comparison with the solid wall casing, the emergence and the evolution of the stall inception waves are suppressed and the nonlinear development of the stall process is delayed with the SPS casing treatment.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

A roadmap for hybrid control using SPS casing treatment

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Fig. 2

Sketch of vortex-wave interaction in SPS casing treatment

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Fig. 3

Stability prediction for transonic compressor J69 stage

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Fig. 4

Total pressure loss of transonic compress J69 stage: (a) rotor blade row and (b) stator blade row

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Fig. 5

Effect of the SPS casing treatment on stability of J69 stage at design rotational speed: (a) length of backchamber lb, (b) height of backchamber hb, (c) open area ratio σ, and (d) Mach number of bias flow Mab

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Fig. 6

Schematic of the SPS casing treatment: (a) isometric view and (b) cross-sectional view

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Fig. 7

Schematic of the transonic compressor rig and measurement system: (a) layout of the transonic compressor facility, (b) schematic of the transonic compressor test section, and (c) layout of the transducers—0-0: measurement plane of inlet mass flow rate; I-I: measurement plane of inlet static pressure and total pressure; and II-II:measurement plane of outlet static pressure and total pressure

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Fig. 8

Effect of the casing treatment on pressure characteristics of transonic compressor J69 stage: (a) σb = 6.4%, (b) σb = 8%, and (c) σb  = 12%

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Fig. 9

Effect of the casing treatment on efficiency characteristics of transonic compressor J69 stage: (a) σb = 6.4%, (b) σb = 8%, and (c) σb  = 12%

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Fig. 10

Spanwise distribution of the total pressure ratio behind stator at the near stall point of the mass flow with the solid wall: (a) 65% design speed, (b) 85% design speed, (c) 95% design speed, and (d) 95% design speed with different SPS parameters

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Fig. 11

Comparison of the static pressure signal in time domain during the stall process at 65% design speed: (a) solid wall and (b) casing treatment, σb = 8%, hb = 55 mm

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Fig. 12

PSD analysis comparison during the stall process at 65% design speed: (a) solid wall and (b) casing treatment, σb = 8%, hb = 55 mm

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Fig. 13

Comparison of PSD with and without casing treatment at BP-A at 95% design speed: (a) solid wall and (b) casing treatment, σb = 6.4%, hb = 55 mm

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Fig. 14

Comparison of PSD with and without casing treatment at BP-A at 85% design speed: (a) solid wall and (b) casing treatment, σb = 8%, hb = 35 mm

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Fig. 15

Comparison of PSD with and without casing treatment at BP-A at 65% design speed: (a) solid wall and (b) casing treatment, σb = 12%, hb = 75 mm

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Fig. 16

Comparison of PSD with and without casing treatment on the stall process at 95% design speed: (a) solid wall and (b) casing treatment, σb = 6.4%, hb = 55 mm

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Fig. 17

Comparison of PSD with and without casing treatment on the stall process at 85% design speed: (a) solid wall and (b) casing treatment, σb = 8%, hb = 35 mm

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Fig. 18

Comparison of PSD with and without casing treatment on stall process at 65% design speed: (a) solid wall and (b) casing treatment, σb = 8%, hb = 55 mm

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