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Research Papers

Active Control of the Corner Separation on a Highly Loaded Compressor Cascade With Periodic Nonsteady Boundary Conditions by Means of Fluidic Actuators

[+] Author and Article Information
Marcel Staats

Chair of Aerodynamics,
Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics,
TU Berlin,
Berlin 10587, Germany
e-mail: Marcel.Staats@ilr.tu-berlin.de

Wolfgang Nitsche

Chair of Aerodynamics,
Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics,
TU Berlin,
Berlin 10587, Germany
e-mail: Wolfgang.Nitsche@tu-berlin.de

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received September 30, 2015; final manuscript received October 26, 2015; published online December 4, 2015. Editor: Kenneth C. Hall.

J. Turbomach 138(3), 031004 (Dec 04, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: TURBO-15-1215; doi: 10.1115/1.4031934 History: Received September 30, 2015; Revised October 26, 2015

This paper discusses the impact of a nonsteady outflow condition on the compressor stator flow that is forced through a mimic in the wake of a linear low-speed cascade to simulate the conditions that would be expected in a pulsed detonation engine. 2D/3C-PIV measurements were made to describe the flow field in the passage. Detailed wake measurements provide information about static pressure rise as well as total pressure loss. The stator profile used for the investigations is highly loaded and operates with three-dimensional flow separations under design conditions and without active flow control. It is shown that sidewall actuation helps stabilize the flow field at every phase angle and extends the operating range of the compressor stator. Furthermore, the static pressure gain can be increased by 6% with a 4% loss reduction in time-averaged data.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Experimental setup: (a) cascade test rig and (b) measurement section

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Fig. 3

Principle of fluidic actuators: (a) left output is active and (b) right output is active

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Fig. 4

(a) Actuator's key dimensions and (b) placement inside of stator passage

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Fig. 5

Total pressure output signal of left orifice at f=160 Hz

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Fig. 6

Velocity profile normal to blade surface at different relative suction surface coordinates; white dashed line represents isoline for U/Umax = 0: (a) φ = 360 deg, (b)φ = 140 deg, (c) φ = 210 deg, (d) φ = 280 deg

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Fig. 7

Phase-averaged velocity field at midsection with v = 27 m/s isoline (dashed black line) and area of recirculation (dashed white line): (a) φ = 360 deg, (b) φ = 140 deg, (c) φ = 210 deg, (d) φ = 280 deg

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Fig. 8

Static pressure rise obtained from wake measurements and loss coefficient isolines

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Fig. 9

(a) Phase-averaged static pressure rise coefficient and (b) phase-averaged total pressure loss coefficient

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Fig. 10

Comparison of actuating position regarding reduction of total pressure loss with isolines for the nonactuated flow and Cμ = 1.4%

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Fig. 11

Comparison of actuating position regarding gain of static pressure rise with isolines for the nonactuated flow and Cμ = 1.4%

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Fig. 12

Pitchwise-averaged wake characteristics for Cμ=1.4% and factu = 30 Hz: (a) pressure gain averaged in blade pitch direction, (b) internal pressure loss massflow averaged in blade pitch direction, (c) vorticity averaged in blade pitch direction

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Fig. 13

Phase-dependent impact of actuating frequency to the pressure gain for Cμ = 1.4%: (a) actuator position (s/S)actu=14.5% and (b) actuator position (s/S)actu = 26.5%

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Fig. 14

Comparison of actuating position regarding integral total pressure loss and static pressure rise

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