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Research Papers

Self-Excited Blade Vibration Experimentally Investigated in Transonic Compressors: Acoustic Resonance

[+] Author and Article Information
F. Holzinger

Institute of Gas Turbines and
Aerospace Propulsion,
Technische Universität Darmstadt,
Darmstadt 64287, Germany
e-mail: holzinger@glr.tu-darmstadt.de

F. Wartzek, H.-P. Schiffer

Institute of Gas Turbines and
Aerospace Propulsion,
Technische Universität Darmstadt,
Darmstadt 64287, Germany

S. Leichtfuss, M. Nestle

Turbo Science GmbH,
Darmstadt 64287, Germany

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received July 15, 2015; final manuscript received November 6, 2015; published online December 29, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Rakesh Srivastava.

J. Turbomach 138(4), 041001 (Dec 29, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: TURBO-15-1147; doi: 10.1115/1.4032042 History: Received July 15, 2015; Revised November 06, 2015

This paper investigates the acoustically induced rotor blade vibration that occurred in a state-of-the-art 1.5-stage transonic research compressor. The compressor was designed with the unconventional goal to encounter self-excited blade vibration within its regular operating domain. Despite the design target to have the rotor blades reach negative aerodamping in the near stall region for high speeds and open inlet guide vane, no vibration occurred in that area prior to the onset of rotating stall. Self-excited vibrations were finally initiated when the compressor was operated at part speed with fully open inlet guide vane along nominal and low operating line. The mechanism of the fluid–structure interaction behind the self-excited vibration is identified by means of unsteady compressor instrumentation data. Experimental findings point toward an acoustic resonance originating from separated flow in the variable inlet guide vanes (VIGV). A detailed investigation based on highly resolved wall-pressure data confirms this conclusion. This paper documents the spread in aerodynamic damping calculated by various partners with their respective aeroelastic tools for a single geometry and speed line. This significant spread proves the need for calibration of aeroelastic tools to reliably predict blade vibration. This paper contains a concise categorization of flow-induced blade vibration and defines criteria to quickly distinguish the different types of blade vibration. It further gives a detailed description of a novel test compressor and thoroughly investigates the encountered rotor blade vibration.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Spread in aerodynamic damping predictions by nine OEMS and academic partners for the same 1.5-stage compressor along the 20,000 rpm/0 deg VIGV speed line (for further details, refer to Refs. [24] and [25])

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Fig. 2

Flow-induced vibration (built in Ref. [5])

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Fig. 3

Future compressor stage

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Fig. 4

Unsteady instrumentation

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Fig. 5

Future compressor map

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Fig. 6

Transonic compressor at TU Darmstadt

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Fig. 7

Tangential blade tip deflection and BTC when decelerating along low operating line with fully open VIGVS

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Fig. 8

Spectrogram of strain gauge and BTT data when decelerating along low operating line with fully open VIGVS

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Fig. 9

Spectrogram of strain gauge and wall-pressure data when decelerating along low operating line with fully open VIGVS

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Fig. 10

Spectrogram of rotor Kulite and BTT data when decelerating along low operating line with fully open VIGVS

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Fig. 11

Axial distribution of maximum unsteady wall-pressure fluctuation when decelerating along low operating line with fully open VIGVS

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Fig. 13

Spectrogram of the wall-pressure data when opening the VIGVS from −15 deg to −25 deg at 13,000 rpm/low operating line

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Fig. 14

Relative standard deviation of wall-pressure data when opening the VIGVS from −15 deg to −25 deg at 13,000 rpm/low operating line

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Fig. 15

Spectral map of the wall-pressure data when opening the VIGVS from −15 deg to −25 deg at 13,000 rpm/low operating line

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