0
Research Papers

Influence of Mainstream Turbulence Intensity on Heat Transfer Characteristics of a High Pressure Turbine Stage With Inlet Hot Streak

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhiduo Wang, Zhaofang Liu

Institute of Turbomachinery,
School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China

Zhenping Feng

Institute of Turbomachinery,
School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: zpfeng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received November 2, 2015; final manuscript received November 8, 2015; published online December 29, 2015. Editor: Kenneth C. Hall.

J. Turbomach 138(4), 041005 (Dec 29, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: TURBO-15-1243; doi: 10.1115/1.4032062 History: Received November 02, 2015; Revised November 08, 2015

An unsteady computational study was carried out on GE-E3 high pressure (HP) turbine at inflow turbulence intensities of 5%, 10%, and 20% accompanying with inlet hot streak (HS) at two circumferential positions (impinging and nonimpinging relative to vane leading edge) to analyze the interacted turbulence and HS influences. Turbulence decay mechanisms in turbine passage were presented, and the airfoil heat transfer behaviors were explored by means of adiabatic wall temperature, heat transfer coefficient (HTC), and wall heat flux. The results indicate that the elevated turbulence leads to favorable turbine airfoil temperature distributions, and turbulence induced HS attenuation mainly occurs in vane passage. In addition, the HS dispersion is related directly to the temperature gradients. Although the endwall temperature increases by more than 20 K (2.8% inlet mass-averaged temperature) and midregion temperature decreases by 16 K at blade leading edge, the hot region on blade pressure surface (PS) is only weakened by about 7 K, when turbulence intensity is increased from 5% to 20%. Higher turbulence significantly affects the airfoil HTC, excepting the regions secondary and leakage flow effects are dominating. Therefore, the tip and blade suction surface (SS) trailing edge heat flux is decreased for the temperature decline at higher turbulence, which is beneficial to tip cooling. HS position not only affects the airfoil surface temperature variations but also slightly affects the vane and blade midspan HTC for the variation of heat transfer driving temperature.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Butler, T. L. , Sharma, O. P. , Joslyn, H. D. , and Dring, R. P. , 1989, “ Redistribution of an Inlet Temperature Distortion in an Axial Flow Turbine Stage,” AIAA J. Propul. Power, 5(1), pp. 64–71. [CrossRef]
Shang, T. H. , and Epstein, A. H. , 1997, “ Analysis of Hot Streak Effects on Turbine Rotor Heat Load,” ASME J. Turbomach., 119(3), pp. 544–553. [CrossRef]
Ong, J. , and Miller, R. J. , 2012, “ Hot Streak and Vane Coolant Migration in a Downstream Rotor,” ASME J. Turbomach., 134(5), p. 051002. [CrossRef]
Smith, C. I. , Chang, D. , and Tavoularis, S. , 2012, “ Effect of Inlet Temperature Non-Uniformity on High-Pressure Turbine Performance,” ASME Paper No. GT2010-22845.
He, L. , Menshikova, V. , and Haller, B. R. , 2007, “ Effect of Hot-Streak Counts on Turbine Blade Heat Load and Forcing,” AIAA J. Propul. Power, 23(6), pp. 1235–1241. [CrossRef]
Gundy-Burlet, K. L. , and Dorney, D. J. , 2000, “ Effects of Radial Location on the Migration of Hot Streak in a 1-1/2 Stage Turbine,” AIAA J. Propul. Power, 16(3), pp. 377–387. [CrossRef]
Prasad, D. , and Hendricks, G. J. , 2000, “ A Numerical Study of Secondary Flow in Axial Turbines With Application to Radial Transport of Hot Streaks,” ASME J. Turbomach., 122(4), pp. 667–673. [CrossRef]
Rahim, A. , Khanal, B. , He, L. , and Romero, E. , 2014, “ Effect of NGV Lean Under Influence of Inlet Temperature Traverse,” ASME J. Turbomach., 136(7), p. 071002.
Chana, K. S. , Hurrion, J. R. , and Jones, T. V. , 2003, “ The Design, Development and Testing of a Non-Uniform Inlet Temperature Generator for the QinetiQ Transient Turbine Research Facility,” ASME Paper No. GT2003-38469.
Povey, T. , and Qureshi, I. , 2008, “ A Hot-Streak (Combustor) Simulator Suited to Aerodynamic Performance Measurements,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., Part G, 222(6), pp. 705–720. [CrossRef]
Povey, T. , Chana, K. S. , Jones, T. V. , and Hurrion, J. , 2007, “ The Effect of Hot-Streaks on HP Vane Surface and Endwall Heat Transfer: An Experimental and Numerical Study,” ASME J. Turbomach., 129(1), pp. 32–43. [CrossRef]
Qureshi, I. , Beretta, A. , and Povey, T. , 2011, “ Effect of Simulated Combustor Temperature Non-Uniformity on HP Vane and Endwall Heat Transfer: An Experimental and Computational Investigation,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 133(3), p. 031901. [CrossRef]
Adami, P. , Salvadori, S. , and Chana, K. S. , 2006, “ Unsteady Heat Transfer Topics in Gas Turbine Stages Simulations,” ASME Paper No. GT2006-90298.
Qureshi, I. , Smith, A. D. , Chana, K. S. , and Povey, T. , 2012, “ Effect of Temperature Nonuniformity on Heat Transfer in an Unshrouded Transonic HP Turbine: An Experimental and Computational Investigation,” ASME J. Turbomach., 134(1), p. 011005. [CrossRef]
Chana, K. S. , Povey, T. , and Hones, T. V. , 2003, “ Heat Transfer and Aerodynamics of an Intermediate Pressure Nozzle Guide Vane With and Without Inlet Temperature Non-Uniformity,” ASME Paper No. GT2003-38466.
Mathison, R. M. , Haldeman, C. W. , and Dunn, M. G. , 2012, “ Aerodynamic and Heat Transfer for a Cooled One and One-Half Stage High-Pressure Turbine-Part I: Vane Inlet Temperature Profile Generation and Migration,” ASME J. Turbomach., 134(1), p. 011006. [CrossRef]
Ames, F. E. , 1997, “ The Influence of Large Scale High Intensity Turbulence on Vane Heat Transfer,” ASME J. Turbomach., 119(1), pp. 23–30. [CrossRef]
Barringer, M. D. , Thole, K. A. , and Polanka, M. D. , 2007, “ Experimental Evaluation of an Inlet Profile Generator for High-Pressure Turbine Tests,” ASME J. Turbomach., 129(2), pp. 382–393. [CrossRef]
Ames, F. E. , Argenziano, M. , and Wang, C. , 2004, “ Measurement and Prediction of Heat Transfer Distributions on an Aft-Loaded Vane Subjected to the Influence of Catalytic and Dry Low NOx Combustor Turbulence,” ASME J. Turbomach., 126(1), pp. 139–149. [CrossRef]
Nasir, S. , Carullo, J. S. , Ng, W. F. , Thole, K. A. , Wu, H. , Zhang, L. Z. , and Moon, H. K. , 2009, “ Effects of Large Scale High Freestream Turbulence and Exit Reynolds Number on Turbine Vane Heat Transfer in a Transonic Cascade,” ASME J. Turbomach., 131(2), p. 021021. [CrossRef]
Dring, R. P. , Blair, M. F. , Joslyn, H. D. , Power, G. D. , and Verdon, J. M. , 1987, “ The Effects of Inlet Turbulence and Rotor/Stator Interactions on the Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer of a Large-Scale Rotating Turbine Model-Final Report,” NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH, Report No. NASA-CR-4079.
Rahman, M. H. , Kim, S. I. , and Hassan, I. , 2012, “ Effects of Inlet Temperature Uniformity and Nonuniformity on the Tip Leakage Flow and Rotor Blade Tip and Casing Heat Transfer Characteristics,” ASME J. Turbomach., 134(2), p. 021001. [CrossRef]
Liu, Z. F. , Liu, Z. , and Feng, Z. P. , 2014, “ Unsteady Analysis on the Effects of Tip Clearance Height on Hot Streak Migration Across Rotor Blade Tip Clearance,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 136(8), p. 082605. [CrossRef]
Azad, G. S. , Han, J. C. , Teng, S. , and Boyle, R. J. , 2000, “ Heat Transfer and Pressure Distributions on a Gas Turbine Blade Tip,” ASME J. Turbomach., 122(4), pp. 717–724. [CrossRef]
Zhang, Q. , He, L. , and Rawlinson, A. , 2014, “ Effects of Inlet Turbulence and End-Wall Boundary Layer on Aerothermal Performance of a Transonic Turbine Blade Tip,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 136(5), p. 052603. [CrossRef]
Wheeler, A. P. S. , Atkins, N. R. , and He, L. , 2011, “ Turbine Blade Tip Heat Transfer in Low Speed and High Speed Flows,” ASME J. Turbomach., 133(4), p. 041025. [CrossRef]
Jenkins, S. , Varadarajan, K. , and Bogard, D. G. , 2004, “ The Effects of High Mainstream Turbulence and Turbine Vane Film Cooling on the Dispersion of a Simulated Hot Streak,” ASME J. Turbomach., 126(1), pp. 203–221. [CrossRef]
Durbin, P. A. , 1996, “ On the k-3 Stagnation Point Anomaly,” Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow, 17(1), pp. 89–90. [CrossRef]
Luo, J. , and Razinsky, E. H. , 2008, “ Prediction of Heat Transfer and Flow Transition on Transonic Turbine Airfoils Under High Freestream Turbulence,” ASME Paper No. GT2008-50868.
Zuckerman, N. , and Lior, N. , 2005, “ Impingement Heat Transfer: Correlations and Numerical Modeling,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 127(5), pp. 544–552. [CrossRef]
Luo, J. , Razinsky, E. H. , and Moon, H. K. , 2013, “ Three-Dimensional RANS Prediction of Gas-Side Heat Transfer Coefficients on Turbine Blade and Endwall,” ASME J. Turbomach., 135(2), p. 021005. [CrossRef]
Menter, F. R. , Langtry, R. B. , Likki, S. R. , Suzen, Y. B. , and Huang, P. G. , 2004, “ A Correlation Based Transition Model Using Local Variables Part I-Model Formulation,” ASME Paper No. GT2004-53452.
Langtry, R. B. , Menter, F. R. , Likki, S. R. , Suzen, Y. B. , and Huang, P. G. , 2004, “ A Correlation Based Transition Model Using Local Variables Part II-Test Cases and Industrial Applications,” ASME Paper No. GT2004-53454.
Hylton, L. D. , Mihelc, M. S. , and Turner, E. R. , 1983, “ Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of the Heat Transfer Distribution Over the Surfaces of Turbine Vanes,” NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH, Report No. NASA-CR-168015.
Kwak, J. S. , and Han, J. C. , 2003, “ Heat Transfer Coefficients of a Turbine Blade-Tip and Near-Tip Regions,” J. Thermophys. Heat Transfer, 17(3), pp. 297–303. [CrossRef]
Timko, L. P. , 1984, “ Energy Efficient Engine High Pressure Turbine Component Test Performance Report,” NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH, Report No. NASA-CR-168289.
Radomsky, R. W. , and Thole, K. A. , 2000, “ Flowfield Measurements for a Highly Turbulent Flow in a Stator Vane Passage,” ASME J. Turbomach., 122(2), pp. 255–262. [CrossRef]
Maffulli, R. , and He, L. , 2014, “ Dependence of External Heat Transfer Coefficient and Aerodynamics on Wall Temperature for 3-D Turbine Blade Passage,” ASME Paper No. GT2014-26763.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

C3X cascade midspan HTCs predicted by different turbulence models

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Predicted and experimental HTCs at C3X midspan of different inlet turbulence levels

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Predicted and experimental HTCs on blade tip

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Mesh of the computational domain

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Turbine inlet temperature profiles: (a) radial and circumferential total temperature distributions and (b) inlet total temperature distributions and isosurface of total temperature 780 K

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Turbulence kinetic energy at: (a) vane 50% span and (b) blade 50% span (Tu = 10%, HS at vane leading edge)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Time-averaged turbulence intensity at: (a) vane 50% span and (b) blade 50% span (HS impinging on vane leading edge)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Vane surface temperature at Tu of 5%

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Vane SS limiting streamlines colored with turbulence kinetic energy (adiabatic wall and impinging HS)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Vane surface temperature variations caused by the turbulence effect: (a) T10% − T5% and (b) T20% − T10%

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Temperature at Tu of 5% and 20% and the temperature difference between Tu of 20% and 5% on vane PS 50% axial chord

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Circumferential averaged temperature difference at the vane and blade interface (adiabatic wall condition)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

HTC distributions at: (a) 10% vane span, (b) 50% vane span, and (c) 90% vane span

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Rotor surface temperature at Tu of 5%

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Temperature difference T20% − T5% of a transient time instant at four cross sections to illustrate the HS attenuation (HS at vane midpassage, AC-axial chord)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Time-averaged temperature differences T20% − T5% at three axial cross sections in the rotor passage (HS at leading edge, SF-secondary flow, LF-leakage flow)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 17

Rotor surface temperature differences T20% − T5%

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 18

Circumferential averaged temperature at the blade trailing edge (adiabatic wall condition)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 19

HTC distributions at: (a) 10% blade span, (b) 50% blade span, and (c) 90% blade span

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 20

Tip surface: (a) temperature at Tu of 5% and (b) temperature difference T20% − T5% (left for HS at vane leading edge, and right for HS at vane midpassage)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 21

Tip HTC distributions at: (a) Tu = 5%, (b) Tu = 10%, and (c) Tu = 20% (left for HS at vane leading edge and right for HS at vane midpassage)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 22

HTC differences at blade tip surface for HS at vane leading edge

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 23

Isentropic Mach number of tip surface and Mach number of four axial cross sections for Tu of 10% and HS at vane leading edge

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 24

Blade surface heat flux difference q20% − q5% for HS at vane midpassage

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In