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Research Papers

Unsteady Measurements of Periodic Effects in a Transonic Compressor With Casing Treatments

[+] Author and Article Information
Christoph Brandstetter

Institute of Gas Turbines and
Aerospace Propulsion,
Technische Universität Darmstadt,
Otto-Berndt-Str. 2,
Darmstadt 64287, Germany
e-mail: brandstetter@glr.tu-darmstadt.de

Fabian Wartzek, Jan Werner, Heinz-Peter Schiffer

Institute of Gas Turbines and
Aerospace Propulsion,
Technische Universität Darmstadt,
Otto-Berndt-Str. 2,
Darmstadt 64287, Germany

Frank Heinichen

Rolls Royce Deutschland,
Eschenweg 11,
Dahlewitz 15827, Germany

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received October 12, 2015; final manuscript received November 10, 2015; published online January 27, 2016. Editor: Kenneth C. Hall.

J. Turbomach 138(5), 051007 (Jan 27, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: TURBO-15-1224; doi: 10.1115/1.4032185 History: Received October 12, 2015; Revised November 10, 2015

Application of nonaxisymmetric casing treatments (CTs) can extend the operating range of a transonic compressor significantly. Recent CT designs have proven successful at achieving operating range extension without efficiency loss under design conditions. Two different CT designs were investigated on a high-speed one and a half stage test rig using extensive instrumentation. The stage setup is representative of the front stage of a modern high-pressure compressor. Results of particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements taken in the blade tip region underneath the CT show a significantly modified flow structure compared to the smooth casing reference case. Blockage zone, secondary flow, and shock structures are affected by the CT, especially in highly throttled operating conditions. The stall inception process of the system with axial slots shows unexpected behavior, with modal activities that are not observed without CT. These activities are resolved using unsteady wall pressure (WP) and hot wire measurements.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Flow structure in transonic blade tip region

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Fig. 2

Darmstadt transonic compressor

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Fig. 3

Axial slot geometry and instrumentation

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Fig. 4

Tip Injection geometry and instrumentation

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Fig. 5

Light sheet position in axial slots

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Fig. 6

Optical access to axial slots

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Fig. 7

Views through cavity window toward light sheet plane

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Fig. 8

Optical access to tip injection

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Fig. 9

Stereo PIV camera setup

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Fig. 10

WP contours at different operating points on design speedline

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Fig. 11

Local relative standard deviation of WP at NS operating points

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Fig. 12

Steady-state stereo PIV results for relative in plane mach number and radial mach number; interpolation in hidden areas; all CT–rotor and CTIGV phases averaged for axial slot setup; comparison of detected shock position between PIV and WP measurements

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Fig. 13

Example of measured PIV data, derivation of vortex structure from radial velocity; operating point NSSC of smooth casing setup

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Fig. 14

Comparison of WP and PIV shock detection; variance of shock position depending on phase between rotor and CT increases toward lower mass flow

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Fig. 15

Time resolved injection process measured with phase locked PIV for axial slot configuration at NSAS operating point. The rotor is locked, CT travels upward; four time-steps from left to right; interpolation in hidden areas; all CTIGV phases averaged.

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Fig. 16

Shock positions 17 revolutions before first stall cell for axial slots while closing throttle from NSAS to stall; variance of shock position increasing to ± 20% of blade spacing (t)

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Fig. 17

Shock positions 110 revolutions before first stall cell for axial slot configuration at design speedline; constantly closing throttle; unsteady WP measurements at 500 kHz sampling rate

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Fig. 18

Development of normalized recirculation velocity inside axial slots CT for different operating points on design speedline and before stall inception; measured via hot wire probe inside CT cavity

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