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Research Papers

Design Method for the Volute Profile of a Squirrel Cage Fan With Space Limitation

[+] Author and Article Information
Xuanfeng Wen

Department of Fluid Machinery and Engineering,
School of Energy and Power Energy,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
No. 28 Xianning West Road,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: windfly1102@stu.xjtu.edu.cn

Yijun Mao

Department of Fluid Machinery and Engineering,
School of Energy and Power Energy,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
No. 28 Xianning West Road,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: maoyijun@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Xin Yang

Guangdong Sunwill Precising Plasitc Co.,
No. 6, Keyuan 1st Road,
Shunde Ronggui Hi-tech Development Zone,
Foshan, Guangdong 528305, China
e-mail: sdswyx@163.com

Datong Qi

Department of Fluid Machinery and Engineering,
School of Energy and Power Energy,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
No. 28 Xianning West Road,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 170049, China
e-mail: dtqi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received January 18, 2015; final manuscript received January 13, 2016; published online March 1, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Rolf Sondergaard.

J. Turbomach 138(8), 081001 (Mar 01, 2016) (13 pages) Paper No: TURBO-15-1013; doi: 10.1115/1.4032537 History: Received January 18, 2015; Revised January 13, 2016

The uncontinuous volute profile (UVP) is widely used in the squirrel cage fan to meet the space limitation in the air conditioning system. However, it usually causes an obvious performance drop due to the unreasonable impeller–volute interaction. This paper employs two improved design methods, i.e., downsized volute profile (DVP) and partial flow volute profile (PVP), to enhance the aerodynamic performance of the fan installed in a limited space. Experimental results validate the positive effects of these two design methods on the aerodynamic performance. The results obtained by the flow simulation reveal that the pressure field inside the fan with the improved volute profiles is much more uniform than that with the UVP; thus, the improved volute profiles are beneficial for the increase of the fan pressure rise and the reduction of the flow loss. For the investigated fan, it is suggested that the design method of the DVP is more suitable for slight space limitation, while the design method of the PVP is more suitable for significant space limitation.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Configuration of the squirrel cage fan

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Fig. 2

Sketch of the volute profile and a fan coil unit equipped with squirrel cage fans: (a) volute profile, (b) fan coil unit, and (c) cross section of the fan coil unit

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Fig. 4

Two types of UVPs and their cross section area: (a) volute profiles and (b) cross section area

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Fig. 6

Two types of DVPs and their cross section area: (a) volute profiles and (b) cross section area

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Fig. 8

Two types of PVPs and their cross section area: (a) volute profiles and (b) cross section area

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Fig. 9

Aerodynamic performance test setup: (a) sketch of the experimental system and test facility—1, electric cabinet; 2, speed sensor; 3, tested fan; 4, flow-regulating honeycomb; 5, multiple nozzles; 6, auxiliary supply system; 7, pressure transducer; 8, temperature and humidity sensor; 9, data acquisition; 10, personal computer; and 11, frequency converter #1 and (b) photograph of the test facility

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Fig. 10

Relationship between the motor input power and motor efficiency

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Fig. 11

Experimental aerodynamic performances in the case of δ = 9.3%: (a) Q–Pt and (b) Q–ηt

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Fig. 12

Experimental aerodynamic performances in the case of δ = 23%: (a) Q–Pt and (b) Q–ηt

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Fig. 13

Computational model of the squirrel cage fan: (a) geometry model, (b) mesh model, and (c) volute and chamber mesh

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Fig. 14

Comparison of performance curves with different volute profiles: (a) numerical data, δ = 9.3%; (b) experimental data, δ = 9.3%; (c) numerical data, δ = 23%; and (d) experimental data, δ = 23%

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Fig. 15

Flow patterns of the UVP at different Z/b (δ = 9.3%): (a) Z/b = 20%, (b) Z/b = 50%, and (c) Z/b = 80%

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Fig. 16

Flow patterns of the DVP at different Z/b (δ = 9.3%): (a) Z/b = 20%, (b) Z/b = 50%, and (c) Z/b = 80%

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Fig. 17

Flow patterns of the UVP at different Z/b (δ = 23%): (a)Z/b = 20%, (b) Z/b = 50%, and (c) Z/b = 80%

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Fig. 18

Flow patterns of the PVP at different Z/b (δ = 23%): (a)Z/b = 20%, (b) Z/b = 50%, and (c) Z/b = 80%

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Fig. 19

Velocity vector distribution at Z/b = 50% in the case of δ = 23%: (a) UVP and (b) PVP

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Fig. 20

Section definition for analysis

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Fig. 21

Numerical results, comparisons of Kp, ηimp_num, and ηfan_num in the case of δ = 9.3%: (a) total pressure loss coefficient and (b) impeller and fan efficiency

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Fig. 22

Numerical results, comparison of Kp, ηimp_num, and ηfan_num in the case of δ = 23%: (a) total pressure loss coefficient and (b) impeller and fan efficiency

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Fig. 23

Numerical results, comparisons of static pressure recovery coefficients: (a) δ = 9.3% and (b) δ = 23%

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Fig. 24

Experimental results, PsQ: (a) δ = 9.3% and (b) δ = 23%

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Fig. 25

Volute cross section area: (a) δ = 9.3% and (b) δ = 23%

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