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Research Papers

Investigation of Spiral and Sweeping Holes

[+] Author and Article Information
Douglas Thurman

U.S. Army Research Laboratory,
Cleveland, OH 44135
e-mail: drthurman@nasa.gov

Philip Poinsatte

NASA Glenn Research Center,
Cleveland, OH 44135
e-mail: poinsatte@nasa.gov

Ali Ameri

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
The Ohio State University,
Columbus, OH 43210
e-mail: ali.a.ameri@nasa.gov

Dennis Culley

NASA Glenn Research Center,
Cleveland, OH 44135
e-mail: dennis.e.culley@nasa.gov

Surya Raghu

Advanced Fluidics LLC,
Columbia, MD 21045
e-mail: sraghu@advancedfluidics.com

Vikram Shyam

NASA Glenn Research Center,
Cleveland, OH 44135
e-mail: vikram.shyam-1@nasa.gov

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received December 16, 2015; final manuscript received February 16, 2016; published online April 12, 2016. Editor: Kenneth C. Hall.This material is declared a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

J. Turbomach 138(9), 091007 (Apr 12, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: TURBO-15-1305; doi: 10.1115/1.4032839 History: Received December 16, 2015; Revised February 16, 2016

Surface infrared thermography, hotwire anemometry, and thermocouple surveys were performed on two new film cooling hole geometries: spiral/rifled holes and fluidic sweeping holes. The spiral holes attempt to induce large-scale vorticity to the film cooling jet as it exits the hole to prevent the formation of the kidney-shaped vortices commonly associated with film cooling jets. The fluidic sweeping hole uses a passive in-hole geometry to induce jet sweeping at frequencies that scale with blowing ratios. The spiral hole performance is compared to that of round holes with and without compound angles. The fluidic hole is of the diffusion class of holes and is therefore compared to a 777 hole and square holes. A patent-pending spiral hole design showed the highest potential of the nondiffusion-type hole configurations. Velocity contours and flow temperature were acquired at discreet cross sections of the downstream flow field. The passive fluidic sweeping hole shows the most uniform cooling distribution but suffers from low span-averaged effectiveness levels due to enhanced mixing. The data were taken at a Reynolds number of 11,000 based on hole diameter and freestream velocity. Infrared thermography was taken for blowing ratios of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 at a density ratio of 1.05. The flow inside the fluidic sweeping hole was studied using 3D unsteady Reynolds-average Navier–Stokes (RANS).

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Vortical structures for jet in crossflow [5]

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Fig. 2

Schematic and functioning of a fluidic sweeping actuator

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Fig. 3

Frequency and mass flow characteristics of a sweeping jet [12,13]

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Fig. 5

Test section floor showing insert for cooling hole

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Fig. 6

Hole exit shapes: (a) fluidic and square, (b) 777, (c) smooth, (d) compound angle, and (e) spiral

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Fig. 7

Geometry of fluidic and square holes

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Fig. 8

Geometry of 777 hole [14]

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Fig. 9

Geometry of spiral holes

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Fig. 10

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grid for fluidic hole

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Fig. 11

Snapshots of Mach number in midplane of fluidic hole from unsteady 3D CFD at BR = 2.0 (blue = 0 and red = 0.45)

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Fig. 12

Velocity magnitude (m/s) snapshots from unsteady 2D CFD of fluidic holes without crossflow at exit: (a) synchronously starting at 1.5 ms, (b) well-coupled plenum, (c) uncoupled plenum, and (d) weakly coupled plenum at 10 ms

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Fig. 13

Unsteady snapshot of effectiveness contours from CFD at BR = 2.0

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Fig. 14

Raw infrared thermograph showing regions of interest for effectiveness computation

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Fig. 15

Adiabatic film effectiveness based on IR surface temperature measurements for square, 777, and fluidic hole at DR = 1.05. Left to right: BR = 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5.

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Fig. 16

Span-averaged film effectiveness for P/D = 6.0 and DR = 1.05, for fluidic, 777, and square holes

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Fig. 17

Centerline effectiveness for P/D = 6.0 and DR = 1.05, for fluidic, 777, and square holes

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Fig. 18

Midpitch effectiveness for P/D = 6.0 and DR = 1.05, for fluidic, 777, and square holes

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Fig. 25

PIV measurements: (a) smooth and (b) spiral

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Fig. 24

Hotwire survey measurements: (a) smooth, (b) spiral rotating inward, and (c) spiral rotating outward

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Fig. 23

Thermocouple survey measurements: (a) smooth, (b) spiral rotating inward, and (c) spiral rotating outward

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Fig. 22

Film effectiveness based on IR surface temperature measurements for (a) smooth circular and (b) spiral holes at P/D = 3.0 and BR = 2.0

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Fig. 21

Span-averaged film effectiveness for P/D = 6.0, DR = 1.05, and Re = 11,000 for circular, compound angle circular, and spiral holes

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Fig. 20

Adiabatic film effectiveness based on IR surface temperature measurements for cylindrical-type holes at P/D = 6.0, L/D = 4.0, and Re = 11,000. Left to right: BR = 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5.

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Fig. 19

Spanwise plots of adiabatic effectiveness at BR = 2.5 at X/D = 10

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