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Research Papers

Investigation on Pressure Fluctuation Related to Mild Surge in Multistage Centrifugal Blower With Inlet Guide Vane

[+] Author and Article Information
Kiyotaka Hiradate

Advanced Simulation Research Department,
Center for Technology Innovation—Mechanical
Engineering, Research & Development Group,
Hitachi, Ltd.,
832-2 Horiguchi,
Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034, Japan
e-mail: Kiyotaka.hiradate.kf@hitachi.com

Satoshi Joukou

Pump System Global Center,
Pump & Fan Division,
Industrial Products Company,
Hitachi, Ltd.,
603 Kandatsu,
Tsuchiura, Ibaraki 300-0013, Japan
e-mail: satoshi.joukou.zg@hitachi.com

Kiyohide Sakamoto

Advanced Simulation Research Department,
Center for Technology Innovation—Mechanical
Engineering, Research & Development Group,
Hitachi, Ltd.,
832-2 Horiguchi,
Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034, Japan
e-mail: kiyohide.sakamoto.qt@hitachi.com

Yasushi Shinkawa

Fan & Blower System Department,
Pump & Fan Division,
Industrial Products Company,
Hitachi, Ltd.,
603 Kandatsu,
Tsuchiura, Ibaraki 300-0013, Japan
e-mail: yasushi.shinkawa.br@hitachi.com

Takeshi Uchiyama

Fan & Blower System Department,
Pump & Fan Division,
Industrial Products Company,
Hitachi, Ltd.,
603 Kandatsu,
Tsuchiura, Ibaraki 300-0013, Japan
e-mail: takeshi.uchiyama.nj@hitachi.com

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received January 30, 2016; final manuscript received March 17, 2016; published online May 10, 2016. Editor: Kenneth C. Hall.

J. Turbomach 138(11), 111003 (May 10, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: TURBO-16-1026; doi: 10.1115/1.4033262 History: Received January 30, 2016; Revised March 17, 2016

Centrifugal blowers are widely used for gas compression in a variety of industrial fields; however, a wider operating range is required in these machines. Investigations on the generation mechanism of unsteady flow (i.e., surge) are very important to improve the operating range. The purpose of this study is to clarify the generation mechanism of pressure fluctuations in a multistage centrifugal blower equipped with inlet guide vanes (IGVs) upstream during the first stage under the IGVs partially open condition. These pressure fluctuations occur at flowrates when the slope of the total system head curve is steeply negative. According to our previous study on the detailed unsteady pressure measurements, this pressure oscillation is supposed to be the mild surge caused by the positive slope of the head curves at the second to the last stages. The slope of the total system head curve was kept negative due to the steeply negative slope of the head curve during the first stage. Thus, the whole compression system seemed to be stable. To confirm the validity of this hypothesis, system dynamic simulations based on Greitzer's lumped-parameter model were conducted using newly measured static pressure-rise characteristic curves of each stage in a four-stage centrifugal blower. In these simulations, the pressure-rise characteristic curves of the first stage and the second to last stages were modeled as two different actuator disks, and the stabilization/destabilization effects of each stage on the system dynamic characteristics were separately taken into account under the IGVs partially open condition. The system dynamic simulation reproduced the mild surge behavior of the system under the IGVs partially open condition when the slope of the total system head curve was still kept steeply negative. The calculated amplitude and frequency of the pressure fluctuations caused by the mild surge showed satisfactory agreement with the measured ones. However, the inception flowrate of the system instability in the simulation was approximately 7% smaller than that in the measurement. From these results, we confirmed that the pressure fluctuation occurred under the IGVs partially open condition was caused by the mild surge due to the positive slope of the pressure-rise characteristic during the second to last stage. In addition, we found that this mild surge was caused by the stall of the vaned diffusers during the second to last stage.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Location of static pressure taps in LSD

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Fig. 3

Location of high-response pressure transducers

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Fig. 6

Time-averaged Psu fluctuation spectra at IOR 4.5%

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Fig. 5

Time history of Psu fluctuations at IOR 4.5%

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Fig. 4

Total-system head-flow characteristics

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of tested blower in previous study

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Fig. 7

Result of cross spectrum analysis between LSD1 and LSD3 (f/F of 0.218 corresponds to peak frequency of Psu fluctuation observed at point [c])

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Fig. 8

Static pressure-rise characteristics of first and second stage at IOR 10%

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Fig. 9

Schematic diagram of tested blower

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Fig. 10

Section diagram of tested blower

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Fig. 11

Total-stage static pressure-rise characteristic curves

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Fig. 12

Static pressure-rise coefficient characteristics of each stage at IOR 4%

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Fig. 13

Diagram of lumped-parameter model

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Fig. 15

Result of system dynamics calculation (IOR 4%, Initial condition: m̃cor=0.0292)

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Fig. 14

Nondimensional steady-state pressure-rise characteristics at IOR 4%

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Fig. 16

Result of system dynamics calculation (IOR 4%, Initial condition: m̃cor=0.0281)

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Fig. 17

Static pressure-rise characteristics of impeller and LSD in second stage in previous study

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