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Research Papers

Thermal Investigation of Integrated Combustor Vane Concept Under Engine-Realistic Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
Simon Jacobi

Osney Thermo-Fluids Laboratory,
Department of Engineering Science,
University of Oxford,
Oxford OX2 0ES, UK
e-mail: simon.jacobi@eng.ox.ac.uk

Budimir Rosic

Osney Thermo-Fluids Laboratory,
Department of Engineering Science,
University of Oxford,
Oxford OX2 0ES, UK

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received August 23, 2016; final manuscript received August 30, 2016; published online September 27, 2016. Editor: Kenneth Hall.

J. Turbomach 139(2), 021005 (Sep 27, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: TURBO-16-1204; doi: 10.1115/1.4034588 History: Received August 23, 2016; Revised August 30, 2016

This paper presents a thermal investigation of the integrated combustor vane concept for power generation gas turbines with individual can combustors. This concept has the potential to replace the high-pressure turbine’s first vanes by prolonged combustor walls. Experimental measurements are performed on a linear high-speed cascade consisting of two can combustors and two integrated vanes. The modularity of the facility allows for the testing at engine-realistic high turbulence levels, as well as swirl strengths with opposing swirl directions. The heat transfer characteristics of the integrated vanes are compared to conventional nozzle guide vanes. The experimental measurements are supported by detailed numerical simulations using the in-house computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code TBLOCK. Experimental as well as numerical results congruently indicate a considerable reduction of the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) on the integrated vanes surfaces and endwalls caused by a differing state of boundary layer thickness. The studies furthermore depict a slight, nondetrimental shift in the heat transfer coefficient distributions and the strength of the integrated vanes secondary flows as a result of engine-realistic combustor swirl.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

MHI G-type gas turbine (a) and heat transfer coefficient distributions on conventional (b) and integrated (c) vanes; adapted from Ref. [27]

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Fig. 2

Working section of the experimental facility including swirler, transition duct, and conventional vanes (left) or integrated vanes (right)

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Fig. 3

Schematic computational domain of integrated vane design

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Fig. 4

Measured HTC on conventional vanes’ (a) and integrated vane’s (b) suction surfaces

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Fig. 5

Measured HTC on shielded conventional vane’s (a) and integrated vane’s (b) pressure surface

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Fig. 6

Measured HTC on conventional vane’s (a) and integrated vane’s (b) hub endwall

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Fig. 7

Axial cut showing predicted dimensionless total pressure distribution for conventional vanes (a) and integrated vane (b)

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Fig. 8

Predicted heat transfer coefficient levels for conventional (a) and integrated (b) vanes

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Fig. 10

Traverse measurements downstream of integrated vanes showing dimensionless total pressure distributions for a no-swirl (a), swirl (b), and reversed swirl (c) setup

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Fig. 9

Traverse measurements at the exit of the combustor transition duct showing dimensionless total pressure (top), yaw (middle), and pitch (bottom) distributions

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Fig. 14

Measured HTC contour and predicted isentropic Mach number lines on integrated vane’s suction surface with swirl (a) and reversed swirl (b)

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Fig. 13

Predicted dimensionless total pressure downstream of the integrated vane with swirl (a) and reversed swirl (b); axial cut of static pressure; isosurface of total pressure; and streamtraces

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Fig. 12

Pitchwise-averaged dimensionless total pressure (a) and yaw (b) downstream of the integrated vane for a no-swirl, swirl, and reversed swirl scenario; experiments (dots) and simulations (lines)

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Fig. 11

Traverse measurements downstream of integrated vanes showing yaw distributions for a no-swirl (a), swirl (b), and reversed swirl (c) setup

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Fig. 16

Measured HTC on integrated vane’s endwall with swirl (a) and reversed swirl (b)

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Fig. 15

Measured HTC contour and predicted isentropic Mach number lines on integrated vane’s pressure surface with swirl (a) and reversed swirl (b)

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