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Research Papers

Effects of Geometry, Spacing, and Number of Pin Fins in Additively Manufactured Microchannel Pin Fin Arrays

[+] Author and Article Information
Katharine K. Ferster

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical and
Nuclear Engineering,
The Pennsylvania State University,
3127 Research Drive,
State College, PA 16801
e-mail: kkf5066@psu.edu

Kathryn L. Kirsch

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical and
Nuclear Engineering,
The Pennsylvania State University,
3127 Research Drive,
State College, PA 16801
e-mail: kathryn.kirsch@psu.edu

Karen A. Thole

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical and
Nuclear Engineering,
The Pennsylvania State University,
136 Reber Building,
University Park, PA 16802
e-mail: kthole@psu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received August 27, 2017; final manuscript received September 10, 2017; published online October 31, 2017. Editor: Kenneth Hall.

J. Turbomach 140(1), 011007 (Oct 31, 2017) (10 pages) Paper No: TURBO-17-1138; doi: 10.1115/1.4038179 History: Received August 27, 2017; Revised September 10, 2017

The demand for higher efficiency is ever present in the gas turbine field and can be achieved through many different approaches. While additively manufactured parts have only recently been introduced into the hot section of a gas turbine engine, the manufacturing technology shows promise for more widespread implementation since the process allows a designer to push the limits on capabilities of traditional machining and potentially impact turbine efficiencies. Pin fins are conventionally used in turbine airfoils to remove heat from locations in which high thermal and mechanical stresses are present. This study employs the benefits of additive manufacturing to make uniquely shaped pin fins, with the goal of increased performance over conventional cylindrical pin fin arrays. Triangular, star, and spherical shaped pin fins placed in microchannel test coupons were manufactured using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). These coupons were experimentally investigated for pressure loss and heat transfer at a range of Reynolds numbers. Spacing, number of pin fins in the array, and pin fin geometry were variables that changed pressure loss and heat transfer in this study. Results indicate that the additively manufactured triangles and cylinders outperform conventional pin fin arrays, while stars and dimpled spheres did not.

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Figures

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Fig. 3

Test facility used for flow and heat transfer tests

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Fig. 2

Three-dimensional images of the internal channel for each pin shape, along with a 2D slice of the coupons with the corresponding CAD models

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Fig. 1

Depiction of surface roughness calculations with two-dimensional (2D) slice

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Fig. 4

Friction factor results from coupons with S/D = 4.0, X/D = 2.6

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Fig. 5

Friction factor results from coupons with S/D = 2.0, X/D = 2.6

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Fig. 6

Friction factor results from coupons with S/D = 1.5 and S/D = 1.3, and two other streamwise spacings of X/D = 1.3 and X/D = 2.6

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Fig. 11

Heat transfer results for coupons containing the same wetted surface area. Spanwise and streamwise spacing differ among all coupons.

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Fig. 12

Friction factor augmentation versus Nusselt number augmentation for all DMLS microchannels from the current study, straight DMLS microchannels [33], and conventionally manufactured (relatively smooth walled) studies containing pin fins [8,45], and ribs [46]

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Fig. 7

Friction factor results for coupons containing the same wetted surface area. Both streamwise and spanwise spacing vary among all coupons.

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Fig. 8

Heat transfer results for coupons with S/D = 4.0, X/D = 2.0

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Fig. 9

Heat transfer results for coupons with S/D = 2.0, X/D = 2.6

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Fig. 10

Heat transfer results for coupons with S/D = 1.5, and two streamwise spacings of X/D = 2.6 and X/D = 1.3

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