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research-article

EFFECTS OF GEOMETRY, SPACING, AND NUMBER OF PIN FINS IN ADDITIVELY MANUFACTURED MICROCHANNEL PIN FIN ARRAYS

[+] Author and Article Information
Katharine K. Ferster

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University 3127 Research Dr, State College, PA 16801, USA
kkf5066@psu.edu

Kathryn L. Kirsch

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University 3127 Research Dr, State College, PA 16801, USA
kathryn.kirsch@psu.edu

Karen A. Thole

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University 136 Reber Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
kthole@psu.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038179 History: Received August 27, 2017; Revised September 10, 2017

Abstract

The demand for higher efficiency is ever-present in the gas turbine field and can be achieved through many different approaches. While additively manufactured parts have only recently been introduced into the hot section of a gas turbine engine, the manufacturing technology shows promise for more widespread implementation since the process allows a designer to push the limits on capabilities of traditional machining and potentially impact turbine efficiencies. Pin fins are conventionally used in turbine airfoils to remove heat from locations in which high thermal and mechanical stresses are present. This study employs the benefits of additive manufacturing to make uniquely shaped pin fins, with the goal of increased performance over conventional cylindrical pin fin arrays. Triangular, star, and spherical shaped pin fins placed in microchannel test coupons were manufactured using Direct Metal Laser Sintering. These coupons were experimentally investigated for pressure loss and heat transfer at a range of Reynolds numbers. Spacing, number of pin fins in the array, and pin fin geometry were variables that changed pressure loss and heat transfer in this study. Results indicate that the additively manufactured triangles and cylinders outperform conventional pin fin arrays, while stars and dimpled spheres did not.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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