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research-article

Effectiveness Measurements of Additively Manufactured Film Cooling Holes

[+] Author and Article Information
Curtis K. Stimpson

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University 3127 Research Dr, State College, PA 16801, USA
curtis.stimpson@psu.edu

Jacob C. Snyder

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University 3127 Research Dr, State College, PA 16801, USA
jacob.snyder@psu.edu

Karen A. Thole

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University 136 Reber Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
kthole@psu.edu

Dominic Mongillo

Pratt & Whitney 400 Main Street, East Hartford, CT 06118, USA
dominic.mongillo@pw.utc.com

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038182 History: Received September 14, 2017; Revised October 03, 2017

Abstract

As additive manufacturing (AM) technologies utilizing metal powders continue to mature, the usage of AM parts in gas turbine engines will increase. Current metal AM technologies produce parts with substantial surface roughness that can only be removed from external surfaces and internal surfaces that are accessible for smoothing. Difficulties arise in making smooth the surfaces of small internal channels, which means the augmentation of pressure loss and heat transfer due to roughness must be accounted for in the design. As gas turbine manufacturers have only recently adopted metal AM technologies, much remains to be examined before the full impacts of applying AM to turbine parts are understood. Although discrete film cooling holes have been extensively studied for decades, this objective of this study was to understand how the roughness of film cooling holes made using AM can affect the overall cooling effectiveness. Coupons made from a high temperature nickel alloy with engine-scale film holes were tested in a rig designed to simulate engine relevant conditions. Two different hole sizes and two different build directions were examined at various blowing ratios. Results showed that the effectiveness is dependent on the build direction and the relative size of the hole. It was also discovered that commercially available AM processes could not reliably produce small holes with predictable behavior.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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