0
Research Papers

Vane Suction Surface Heat Transfer in Regions of Secondary Flows: The Influence of Turbulence Level, Reynolds Number, and the Endwall Boundary Condition

[+] Author and Article Information
Justin E. Varty, Loren W. Soma

Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of North Dakota,
Grand Forks, ND 58202

Forrest E. Ames

Mechanical Engineering Department,
University of North Dakota,
Grand Forks, ND 58202
e-mail: forrest.ames@engr.und.edu

Sumanta Acharya

Professor
Illinois Institute of Technology,
Mechanical, Materials, and
Aerospace Engineering,
Chicago, IL 60616
e-mail: sacharya1@itt.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received September 20, 2017; final manuscript received October 4, 2017; published online December 6, 2017. Editor: Kenneth Hall. The United States Government retains, and by accepting the article for publication, the publisher acknowledges that the United States Government retains, a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this work, or allow others to do so, for United States government purposes.

J. Turbomach 140(2), 021010 (Dec 06, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: TURBO-17-1172; doi: 10.1115/1.4038281 History: Received September 20, 2017; Revised October 04, 2017

Secondary flows in vane passages sweep off the endwall and onto the suction surface at a location typically close to the throat. These endwall/vane junction flows often have an immediate impact on heat transfer in this region and also move any film cooling off the affected region of the vane. The present paper documents the impact of secondary flows on suction surface heat transfer acquired over a range of turbulence levels (0.7–17.4%) and a range of exit chord Reynolds numbers (500,000–2,000,000). Heat transfer data are acquired with both an unheated endwall boundary condition and a heated endwall boundary condition. The vane design includes an aft loaded suction surface and a large leading edge diameter. The unheated endwall boundary condition produces initially very high heat transfer levels due to the thin thermal boundary layer starting at the edge of heating. This unheated starting length effect quickly falls off with the thermal boundary layer growth as the secondary flow sweeps up onto the vane suction surface. The heat transfer visualization for the heated endwall condition shows no initial high heat transfer level near the edge of heating on the vane. The heat transfer level in the region affected by the secondary flows is largely uniform, except for a notable depression in the affected region. This heat transfer depression is believed due to an upwash region generated above the separation line of the passage vortex, likely in conjunction with the counter rotating suction leg of the horseshoe vortex. The extent and definition of the secondary flow-affected region on the suction surface are clearly evident at lower Reynolds numbers and lower turbulence levels when the suction surface flow is largely laminar. The heat transfer in the plateau region has a magnitude similar to a turbulent boundary layer. However, the location and extent of this secondary flow-affected region are less perceptible at higher turbulence levels where transitional or turbulent flow is present. Also, aggressive mixing at higher turbulence levels serves to smooth out discernable differences in the heat transfer due to the secondary flows.

Copyright © 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Sieverding, C. H. , 1985, “ Recent Progress in the Understanding of Basic Aspects of Secondary Flows in Turbine Blade Passages,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 107(2), pp. 248–257. [CrossRef]
Langston, L. S. , Nice, M. L. , and Hooper, R. M. , 1977, “ Three-Dimensional Flow Within a Turbine Cascade Passage,” ASME J. Eng. Power, 99(1), pp. 21–28. [CrossRef]
Graziani, R. A. , Blair, M. F. , Taylor, J. R. , and Mayle, R. E. , 1980, “ An Experimental Study of Endwall and Airfoil Surface Heat Transfer in a Large Scale Turbine Blade Cascade,” ASME J. Eng. Power, 102(2), pp. 257–267. [CrossRef]
Chen, P. H. , and Goldstein, R. J. , 1992, “ Convective Transport Phenomena on the Suction Surface of a Turbine Blade Including the Influence of Secondary Flows Near the Endwall,” ASME J. Turbomach., 114(4), pp. 776–787. [CrossRef]
Goldstein, R. J. , and Spores, R. A. , 1988, “ Turbulent Transport on the Endwall in the Region Between Adjacent Turbine Blades,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 110(4a), pp. 862–869. [CrossRef]
Goldstein, R. J. , and Chen, P.-H. , 1987, “ Film Cooling of a Turbine Blade With Injection Through Two Rows of Holes in the Near-Endwall Region,” ASME J. Turbomach., 109(4), pp. 588–593. [CrossRef]
Goldstein, R. , Wang, H. , and Jabbari, M. , 1995, “ The Influence of Secondary Flows Near the Endwall and Boundary Layer Disturbance on Convective Transport From a Turbine Blade,” ASME J. Turbomach., 117(4), pp. 657–665. [CrossRef]
Wang, H. P. , Olson, S. J. , Goldstein, R. J. , and Eckert, E. R. G. , 1997, “ Flow Visualization in a Linear Turbine Cascade of High Performance Turbine Blades,” ASME J. Turbomach., 119(1), pp. 1–8. [CrossRef]
Blair, M. F. , 1992, “ An Experimental Study of Heat Transfer in a Large-Scale Turbine Rotor Passage,” ASME Paper No. 92-GT-195.
Giel, P. W. , Van Fossen, G. J. , Boyle, R. J. , Thurman, D. R. , and Civinskas, K. C. , 1999, “ Blade Heat Transfer Measurements and Predictions in a Transonic Turbine Cascade,” ASME Paper No. 99-GT-125.
Harasgama, S. P. , and Wedlake, E. T. , 1991, “ Heat Transfer and Aerodynamics of a High Rim Speed Turbine Nozzle Guide Vane Tested in the RAE Isentropic Light Piston Cascade (ILPC),” ASME J. Turbomach., 113(3), pp. 384–391. [CrossRef]
Martinez-Botas, R. F. , Lock, G. D. , and Jones, T. V. , 1995, “ Heat Transfer Measurements in an Annular Cascade of Transonic Gas Turbine Blades Using the Transient Liquid Crystal Technique,” ASME J. Turbomach., 117(3), pp. 425–431. [CrossRef]
Ames, F. E. , Barbot, P. A. , and Wang, C. , 2005, “ Effects of Catalytic and Dry Low NOx Combustor Turbulence on Endwall Heat Transfer Distributions,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 127(4), pp. 414–424. [CrossRef]
Ames, F. E. , Barbot, P. A. , and Wang, C. , 2003, “ Effects of Aeroderivative Combustor Turbulence on Endwall Heat Transfer Distributions Acquired in a Linear Vane Cascade,” ASME J. Turbomach., 125(2), pp. 221–231. [CrossRef]
Kingery, J. A. , Ames, F. E. , Downs, J. , Acharya, S. , and Barker, B. J. , 2015, “ An Analysis of a Deposition Tolerant Cooling Approach for Nozzle Guide Vanes,” ASME Paper No. GT2015-42419.
Varty, J. , and Ames, F. E. , 2016, “ Experimental Heat Transfer Distributions Over an Aft Loaded Vane With a Large Leading Edge at Very High Turbulence Levels,” ASME Paper No. IMECE2016-67029.
Busche, M. L. , Moualeu, L. P. , Tang, C. , and Ames, F. E. , 2013, “ Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Measurements in High Solidity Pin Fin Cooling Arrays With Incremental Replenishment,” ASME J. Turbomach., 135(4), p. 041011. [CrossRef]
Busche, M. L. , Kingery, J. E. , and Ames, F. E. , 2014, “ Slot Film Cooling in an Accelerating Boundary Layer With High Free-Stream Turbulence,” ASME Paper No. GT2014-25360.
Kingery, J. , and Ames, F. , 2016, “ Full Coverage Shaped Hole Film Cooling in an Accelerating Boundary Layer With High Free-Stream Turbulence,” ASME J. Turbomach., 138(7), p. 071002. [CrossRef]
ANSYS, 2015, “ ANSYS Fluent Release 16.0 Copyright 2014,” ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA.
Shih, T.-H. , Liou, W. W. , Shabbir, A. , and Zhu, J. , 1995, “ A New kε Eddy-Viscosity Model for High Reynolds Number Turbulent Flows—Model Development and Validation,” Comput. Fluids, 24(3), pp. 227–238. [CrossRef]
Moffat, R. J. , 1988, “ Describing the Uncertainties in Experimental Results,” Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci., 1(1), pp. 3–17. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Vane surface pressure distribution compared with 2D prediction

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic of linear vane cascade showing locations of infrared access

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic of large-scale low-speed cascade wind tunnel

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Surface plot of suction surface Stanton number showing unheated endwall effect, LG, ReC = 1,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Comparison of heat transfer distributions with metal foil surface and black painted surface, SGF, ReC = 1,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

IR camera image of suction surface temperature distribution with heated endwall, SGF, ReC = 1,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Midline comparison of heated and unheated temperatures, thermocouple versus raw IR camera temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Surface plot of suction surface Stanton number showing extent of secondary flows, SGF, ReC = 1,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Surface plot of suction surface Stanton number showing extent of secondary flows, LG, ReC = 1,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Surface plot of suction surface Stanton number showing extent of secondary flows, LG, ReC = 2,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Vane surface Stanton number distributions versus turbulence condition, ReC = 1,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Surface plot of suction surface Stanton number showing extent of secondary flows, LT, ReC = 1,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Surface plot of suction surface Stanton number showing extent of secondary flows, AC, ReC = 1,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Surface plot of suction surface Stanton number showing extent of secondary flows, HT, ReC = 1,000,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Surface plot of suction surface Stanton number showing extent of secondary flows, SGF, ReC = 500,000

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 16

Spanwise variation of suction surface Stanton number showing effect of turbulence level on secondary flow, ReC = 1,000,000, at surface distance 0.603 m

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In