0
research-article

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF TOTAL PRESSURE LOSS DEVELOPMENT IN A HIGHLY LOADED LOW PRESSURE TURBINE CASCADE

[+] Author and Article Information
Philip Bear

U.S Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH, USA
philipbear93@yahoo.com

J. Mitch Wolff

Wright State University, Dayton, OH, USA
mitch.wolff@wright.edu

Andreas Gross

New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA
agross@nmsu.edu

Christopher Marks

U.S Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH, USA
christopher.marks.6@us.af.mil

Rolf Sondergaard

U.S Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH, USA
rolf.sondergaard@us.af.mil

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038413 History: Received September 18, 2017; Revised October 10, 2017

Abstract

Improvements in turbine design methods have resulted in the development of blade profiles with both high lift and good Reynolds lapse characteristics. An increase in aerodynamic loading of blades in the low pressure turbine section of aircraft gas turbine engines has the potential to reduce engine weight or increase power extraction. Increased blade loading means larger pressure gradients and increased secondary losses near the endwall. The present study analyzes the secondary flow field of the front-loaded low-pressure turbine blade designated L2F with and without blade profile contouring at the junction of the blade and endwall. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry data and total pressure loss data are used to describe the secondary flow field. The flow is analyzed in terms of total pressure loss, vorticity, Q-Criterion, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence production. The flow description is then expanded upon using an Implicit Large Eddy Simulation of the flow field. The RANS momentum equations contain terms with pressure derivatives. These equations can be rearranged to form an equation for the change in total pressure along a streamline as a function of velocity only. A comparison of the total pressure transport calculated from the velocity components and the total pressure loss is presented and discussed. Peak values of total pressure transport those of total pressure loss through and downstream of the passage suggesting that total pressure transport is a useful tool for localizing and predicting loss origins and loss development using velocity data which can be obtained non-intrusively.

Section 3: U.S. Gov Contractors
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In