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Research Papers

Measurement of the Mean Flow Field in a Smooth Rotating Channel With Coriolis and Buoyancy Effects

[+] Author and Article Information
Ruquan You, Kuan Wei

National Key Laboratory of Science
and Technology on Aero Engines
Aero-thermodynamics,
The Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine of China,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China

Haiwang Li

National Key Laboratory of Science and
Technology on Aero Engines
Aero-thermodynamics,
The Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine of China,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China
e-mail: 09620@buaa.edu.cn

Zhi Tao

National Key Laboratory of Science and
Technology on Aero Engines
Aero-thermodynamics,
The Collaborative Innovation Center for
Advanced Aero-Engine of China,
Beihang University,
Beijing 100191, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF TURBOMACHINERY. Manuscript received September 20, 2017; final manuscript received November 2, 2017; published online January 17, 2018. Editor: Kenneth Hall.

J. Turbomach 140(4), 041002 (Jan 17, 2018) (8 pages) Paper No: TURBO-17-1170; doi: 10.1115/1.4038870 History: Received September 20, 2017; Revised November 02, 2017

The mean flow field in a smooth rotating channel was measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV) under the effect of buoyancy force. In the experiments, the Reynolds number, based on the channel hydraulic diameter (D) and the bulk mean velocity (Um), is 10,000, and the rotation numbers are 0, 0.13, 0.26, 0.39, and 0.52, respectively. The four channel walls are heated with indium tin oxide (ITO) heater glass, making the density ratio (d.r.) about 0.1 and the maximum value of buoyancy number up to 0.27. The mean flow field was simulated on a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction at the position of 3.5 < X/D < 6.5, where X is along the mean flow direction. The effect of Coriolis force and buoyancy force on the mean flow was taken into consideration in the current work. The results show that the Coriolis force pushes the mean flow to the trailing side, making the asymmetry of the mean flow with that in the static conditions. On the leading surface, due to the effect of buoyancy force, the mean flow field changes considerably. Comparing with the case without buoyancy force, separated flow was captured by PIV on the leading side in the case with buoyancy force. More details of the flow field will be presented in this work.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the mean flow features in a rotating smooth channel

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Fig. 2

Rotating facility and the layout of PIV

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Fig. 4

Setup of the FPGA-based trigger signal generator

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Fig. 5

Velocity profile at static conditions at X/D = 3.5 of current work with PIV and in Ref. [27] with hot wire

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Fig. 6

The distribution of Nu/Nu0 along X/D direction at different rotation number with Reynolds number of 10,000

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Fig. 7

3D reconstruction of mean flow field at X/D = 6 with (a) and without (b) wall heated at static conditions

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Fig. 8

Velocity profile of mean flow at X/D = 6 and Z/D = 0.5 with (a) and without (b) buoyancy force at different rotation numbers

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Fig. 9

3D reconstruction of mean flow field at X/D = 6 with (a) and without (b) wall heated with rotation number of 0.52

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Fig. 10

Velocity profile of mean flow at X/D = 6 and Z/D = 0.5 with Ro = 0.52

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Fig. 11

3D reconstruction of mean flow field with d.r.= 0.1 and Ro = 0.52 at different X/D positions

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Fig. 12

Velocity profile of mean flow with d.r.= 0, Z/D = 0.5, and Ro = 0.52 at different X/D positions (X/D = 4, X/D = 5 and X/D = 6)

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