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Research Papers

Effect of the Combustor Wall on the Aerothermal Field of a Nozzle Guide Vane

[+] Author and Article Information
Ioanna Aslanidou

Future Energy Centre,
Mälardalen University,
Västerċs 721 23, Sweden
e-mail: ioanna.aslanidou@mdh.se

Budimir Rosic

Osney Thermofluids Laboratory,
Department of Engineering Science,
University of Oxford,
Oxford OX2 0ES, UK

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received August 23, 2017; final manuscript received December 11, 2017; published online April 16, 2018. Assoc. Editor: John Clark.

J. Turbomach 140(5), 051009 (Apr 16, 2018) (13 pages) Paper No: TURBO-17-1134; doi: 10.1115/1.4038907 History: Received August 23, 2017; Revised December 11, 2017

In gas turbines with can combustors, the trailing edge (TE) of the combustor transition duct wall is found upstream of every second vane. This paper presents an experimental and numerical investigation of the effect of the combustor wall TE on the aerothermal performance of the nozzle guide vane. In the measurements carried out in a high-speed experimental facility, the wake of this wall is shown to increase the aerodynamic loss of the vane. On the other hand, the wall alters secondary flow structures and has a protective effect on the heat transfer in the leading edge-endwall junction, a critical region for component life. The different clocking positions of the vane relative to the combustor wall are tested experimentally and are shown to alter the aerothermal field. The experimental methods and processing techniques adopted in this work are used to highlight the differences between the different cases studied.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic view of experimental facility including details of the working section [9]

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Fig. 2

Heat flux versus surface temperature for a sample pixel

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Fig. 3

View points of the cascade for IR measurements: (a) view points from the sides (1, 2) and downstream (3) and (b) view point from downstream and above (4)

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Fig. 4

Views of the cascade for IR measurements: (a) vane pressure side (view 1), (b) vane leading edge (view 2), (c) vane suction side (view 3), and (d) hub endwall, viewed from downstream (view 4)

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Fig. 5

Isentropic Mach number (experimental result) and pressure field (numerical result) at midspan: (a) isentropic Mach number for the central vane, (b) total pressure, and (c) static pressure

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Fig. 6

Mass-weighted pitchwise average total pressure loss coefficient downstream of the cascade

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Fig. 7

Nusselt number distribution on the vane pressure side (view 1, Fig. 4(a)): (a) experimental measurement and (b) numerical result

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Fig. 8

Nusselt number distribution on the vane leading edge (view 2, Fig. 4(b)): (a) experimental measurement and (b) numerical result

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Fig. 9

Nusselt number distribution on the vane suction side (view 3, Fig. 4(c)): (a) experimental measurement and (b) numerical result

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Fig. 10

Nusselt number distribution on the hub endwall viewed from downstream (view 4, Fig.4(d)): (a) experimental measurement and (b) numerical result

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Fig. 11

Origin of the high heat transfer region on the vane leading edge (view from upstream): (a) central vane and (b) adjacent vane

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Fig. 12

Nondimensional streamwise vorticity contours on the vane leading edge: (a) central vane LE, (b) adjacent vane LE, and (c) leading edge of the central vane at 8% span

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Fig. 13

Origin of the low heat transfer regions on the suction side of the vane near the trailing edge (view from downstream)

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Fig. 14

Origins of the high heat transfer regions on the suction side-endwall junction near the vane leading edge (view from upstream): (a) central vane and (b) adjacent vane

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Fig. 15

Nusselt number on the vane endwall, numerical result: (a) central vane and (b) adjacent vane

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Fig. 16

Different clocking positions investigated

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Fig. 17

Pressure field (numerical result) and isentropic Mach number for datum, 10% PS, and 10% SS clocking: (a) total pressure, (b) static pressure, and (c) isentropic Mach number at 50% span

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Fig. 18

Isentropic Mach number and surface streamlines (numerical result)

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Fig. 19

Spatially resolved total pressure loss coefficient downstream of the central vane

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Fig. 20

Effect of clocking position on the aerodynamic field: (a) mass-weighted average total pressure loss coefficient and (b) mass-weighted pitchwise average yaw angle

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Fig. 21

Temperature contours and flow streamlines for datum, 10% PS and 10% SS clocking (numerical result)

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Fig. 22

Nusselt number distribution on the vane pressure side for the two clocking positions (view 1, Fig. 4(a)): (a) 10% PS clocking and (b) 10% SS clocking

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Fig. 23

Effect of the clocking position on the Nusselt number on the vane pressure side (view 1, Fig. 4(a)): (a) 10% PS clocking and (b) 10% SS clocking

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Fig. 24

Nusselt number distribution on the leading edge for the two clocking positions (view 2, Fig. 4(b)): (a) 10% PS clocking and (b) 10% SS clocking

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Fig. 25

Effect of the clocking position on the Nusselt number on the vane leading edge (view 2, Fig. 4(b)): (a) 10% PS clocking and (b) 10% SS clocking

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Fig. 26

Nusselt number distribution on the vane suction side for the two clocking positions (view 3, Fig. 4(c)): (a) 10% PS clocking and (b) 10% SS clocking

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Fig. 27

Effect of the clocking position on the Nusselt number on the vane suction side (view 3, Fig. 4(c)): (a) 10% PS clocking and (b) 10% SS clocking

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Fig. 28

Effect of clocking position on the pressure and suction side legs of the horseshoe vortex: (a) 10% PS clocking and (b) 10% SS clocking

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Fig. 29

Nusselt number distribution on the vane endwall viewed from downstream for the two clocking positions (view 4, Fig. 4(d)): (a) 10% PS clocking and (b) 10% SS clocking

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Fig. 30

Effect of the clocking position on the Nusselt number on the vane endwall viewed from downstream (view 4, Fig. 4(d)): (a) 10% PS clocking and (b) 10% SS clocking

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